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Thunder Mountain film adaptation 1935

Roaring Mountain, 1935: Information from IMDb

Publisher Sol Lesser Productions and John Zanft
Directed by David Howard; Assistant director Raoul Pagel
Adapted for screen by Daniel Jarrett and Don Swift

Cast

George O'BrienGeorge O’Brien…Kal Emerson; Barbara FritchieBarbara Fritchie…Sydney Blair; Frances GrantFrances Grant…Nugget; Morgan WallaceMorgan Wallace…Rand Leavitt; George 'Gabby' HayesGeorge ‘Gabby’ F. Hayes…Foley; Edward LeSaintEdward LeSaint…Samuel Blair; Dean Benton (1914-1996)Dean Benton…Steve Sloan; William BaileyWilliam Norton Bailey…Cliff Borden; Sid Jordan (1989-1970)Sid Jordan…Warns Leavitt; Victor Adamson (1890-1970)Victor Adamson…Dissident Miner at Bar; Hank BellHank Bell…Barfly; Harry BowenHarry Bowen…Miner Cheated by Leavitt; Neal HartNeal Hart…Dissident Miner at Bar; Lloyd IngrahamLloyd Ingraham…Dissident Miner at Bar; Clyde McClary…Barfly; Lafe McKeeLafe McKee…Dissident Miner at Bar; Hal PriceHal Price…Dissident Miner at Bar; Carl StockdaleCarl Stockdale…Investor Refusing Cal’s Loan Request; Harry TenbrookHarry Tenbrook…Miner Voting; Arthur Thalasso…Bartender.

Cinematography by Frank B. Good

Film Editing by Robert O. Crandall

Art Direction by Ralph M. DeLacy

Production Manager Edward Gross

Sound by Richard (Dick) E. Tyler

Stunts by Sid Jordan

 
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Posted by on 2018-12-02 in Movies

 

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Film based on To the Last Man, 1933

To the Last Man, 1933: Information from IMdB

Produced by Paramount Pictures, Harold Hurley

Directed by Henry Hathaway

Adapted by Jack Cunningham

Cast  

Randolph ScottRandolph Scott…Lynn Hayden; Esther RalstonEsther Ralston…Ellen Colby; Jack La RueJack La Rue…Jim Daggs; Buster CrabbeBuster Crabbe…Bill Hayden; Barton MacLaneBarton MacLane…Neil Stanley; Noah BeeryNoah Beery…Jed Colby; Gail PatrickGail Patrick…Ann Hayden Stanley; Egon Brechter (1880-1946)Egon Brecher…Mark Hayden; Muriel KirklandMuriel Kirkland…Molly Hayden; Fuzzy KnightFuzzy Knight…Jeff Morley; James C. Eagles…Eli Bruce; Eugenie BessererEugenie Besserer…Granny Spelvin; Harlan Knight (1874-1940)Harlan Knight…Grandpa Chet Spelvin; Jay Ward (1921-1989)Jay Ward…Lynn Hayden – as a Child; Erville AldersonErville Alderson…Judge; Tom Bay…Wounded Hayden Man; James BurkeJames Burke…Kentucky Sheriff; Rosita Butler…Ann Hayden-as a Child; John CarradineJohn Carradine…Pete Garon; Harry CordingHarry Cording…Colby Man Fred; William Gillis…Hayden Man; Cullen Johnson…Bill Hayden-as a Child; Ethan LaidlawEthan Laidlaw…Colby Man; Jim MasonJim Mason…Colby Man Joe; Russ Powell…Greaves; Dick Rush (1884-19..)Dick Rush…Prison Guard; Shirley TempleShirley Temple…Mary Stanley; Blackjack WardBlackjack Ward…Colby Man; Delmar Watson (1926-2008)Delmar Watson…Tad Stanley; Maston WilliamsMaston Williams…Colby Man

Cinematography by Ben F. Reynolds

Film Editing by Jack Scott

Art Direction by A. Earl Hedrick

Composers John Leipold and Ralph Rainger

 
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Posted by on 2018-11-26 in Movies

 

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Grey, Z., 1937. Majesty’s Rancho. New York, New York Sunday News.

When “Majesty’s Rancho” was first published, in New York Sunday News, 26th September 1937, Zane Grey was 65 years old. It’s prequel, The Light of Western Stars, was published 24 years earlier. I mention this, because I believe it has an impact on the end result of “Majesty’s Rancho“. Later publishings were in hardcover in 1938 by Harper & Brothers, in 1942 as an Armed Services Edition and in 1949 by Zane Grey Western Books.

I had to pull back several times while reading “Majesty’s Rancho” and writing this review because I kept on being hit by a sense of “Huh?” and “Say what?”. One reason was the way Madge/Majesty was treated in the story. Grey did not like a female protagonist who might be perceived as possibly stronger than the male protagonist (Pauly, T.H., 2014). By the time he had finished with Madeline in The Light of Western Stars, Grey had found his recipe for breaking such women down and he used that recipe for what it was worth in “Majesty’s Rancho“. He was apparently not alone in not wanting that. Reviewers and the blurb all seem to agree that she needed taking down a few notches.

One of the reasons I felt this way, was because all the main protagonists and the antagonist blamed Madge for their own behavior. Madge blamed Madge for how she behaved, Uhl (antagonist) blamed Madge for how he behaved towards her, Rollie blamed Madge for how he treated her, Lance blamed Madge for how he behaved towards her and Gene blamed Madge for how he and Lance treated her. Talk about internalizing and externalizing blame in stereotypically gendered ways. The only people who did not blame Madge for their own behaviors were Ren Starr and Nels. These two men were voices of reason throughout the story.

Nels: “Wal, I have. An’ I’m gamblin’ on her, Gene. Wild as a young filly, shore she was. But good as gold an’ as true as steel. When she was heah last I had some jars, you bet. I had to figger oot thet times had changed since you an’ me ran after girls. We’ve stayed right in one spot, Gene, an’ this old world has moved on.”

“Right. I’ll bet you we have it coming to us. Madge said in her letter she was having a crowd of college friends come to visit her.”

“Fine. She did thet last time an’ I never had such fun.”

Another thing I had a problem with was the way Madge was blamed for the current finances of the farm. However, when she left the farm, for The University of Southern California, as a 16 year-old their family was wealthy. Madge, herself, had a fond worth a million dollars and her mother was even wealthier. In addition, their ranch was doing really well. That perception was maintained by both her mother and her father the entire time she was away, meaning Madge spent money accordingly. Instead of letting her know that the Crash on Wall Street in 1929 had affected their family and that they all needed to use less money, they told her nothing. Gene had no head for money and kept making unwise money choices. He was afraid of letting Madeline (his wife) do their books in case she found out he had taken out a mortgage on the ranch. All the way through the story, Lance keeps up an internal ranting towards her spending yet he also kept his mouth shut because of a promise to Gene. Madge had sensed something was off the last time she was home but did not know what it was. Before coming home, she had decided she would be spending the rest of her time and money on the upkeep of the ranch. She just wanted one last summer with friends.

“I get it,” she said, soberly, dropping those penetrating eyes. “I’ve always understood Majesty’s Rancho was mine. You know, just in a vain and playful way, perhaps. How about that, Dad—seriously?”

“Of course this ranch is yours—or will be someday, which is just the same. And a white elephant—my daughter.”

“Not for little Madge. What do you suppose I went to college for? What did I study economics for?… Dad—Mom, I tell you I’m home for good. I’m crazy about my home. It has been swell to have unlimited money. Let me play around this summer—entertain my friends—then I’ll hop to the job.”

Madge/Majesty Stewart is the daughter of Gene Stewart and Madeline Hammond from The Light of Western Stars. She has grown up on an awesome ranch right across the border from New Mexico (Blake, K., 2014). When we first meet her she is an honor student and secretary to the student body at the University of Southern California. She is popular with her fellow students and is considered kind and sweet to others, hardworking and a little wild. Her beauty and spirit attract men to her, some nice and some not so nice (like Honey Bee Uhl). Except for Ren Starr and Nels, all the men we get to know in “Majesty’s Rancho” want to possess Madge.

Lance Sidway is the male protagonist. Much like Madge, he is beautiful, kind and sweet to others, hardworking and a little wild. He loves women and they like him. His financial background is completely different to Madge’s, and that background goes some way in explaining how completely incapable he is of understanding Madge. His mom had died early, the Crash and Great Depression came and took their ranch, he had to quit college, his dad died and Lance had to get his sister’s surgery and recovery paid for. So he and Umpqua, his horse, went to Hollywood and Umpqua made a name of itself. Lance got sick of never making a name of himself, always having to be a stunt or boyfriend to  up-and-coming actors, and having to play second fiddle to his horse. So he left Hollywood with Umpqua to find the Wild West he had heard of.

Lance and Umpqua’s ride from Los Angeles, California to Douglas, Arizona.

What he found was that both he and his horse got into better shape and that the West was not so wild after all.

He knew that arid country, having been to Palm Springs and Indio with motion-picture companies. Still, sight of the rolling wasteland with its knolls of mesquite and flats of greasewood, and the irregular barren mountains zigzagging the horizon, afforded him keen pleasure. How different this country from the golden pastures and black hills and swift streams of Oregon! Lance could not have conceived a greater contrast. And by noonday the June heat of the desert was intense. Sweat oozed out of his every pore and Umpqua was wet. But this heat was what both horse and rider needed. They were heavy from underwork and overeating.

Gene Stewart, Madge’s dad, is also mostly a nice guy. He longs for an exciting past he could understand and not the boring demands of being a settled man to an adult (18) daughter. He projects much of his unhappiness on to Madge and there are moments when she wonders if he really loves her. Grey was 65 when the serial was published. He bemoaned the older, slower days when nature remained unspoiled by automobiles and automatic weapons (Cast, C.C., 2008). Gene is written with this type of spirit. Gene’s wife, Madeline is a background figure who comforts Gene and Madge when needed.

When Madge and Lance meet both fall immediately in love. However, from the time they both meet again at the ranch they treat each other atrociously. If this is love, then I’m not missing anything in my life. Why would Grey write them both so jaded? It’s as though he had seen “Gone With the Wind” and wanted to write something like that. Such “romances” have never appealed to me and I wasn not able to finish either the book or watch the film of “Gone With the Wind“.

The main antagonist of “Majesty’s Rancho” is Honey Bee Uhl. Grey often makes his antagonists cartoonish and Uhl is no exception. He did not feel as dangerous as he should have even when the story got to his main scene. I wasn’t able to believe in him, and I think that was part of my problem with this story.

All in all I have to say that “Majesty’s Rancho” is far from one of Grey’s best works. As far as language, it felt authentic. There were racial slurs typical of white farmers of that time. Most of the time I felt as though I was reading the words of a bitter old man, which Grey probably wasn’t. And the romance was soooo not my style. However, if you are into stuff like “Gone With the Wind” then this might be a story for you.


Available free at Roy Glashan’s Library and Internet Archive.

Reviews:

Translations:

  • Croatian: Grey, Z., 1961/1964/1966/1985. Princezin ranč. Opatija: Otokar Keršovani. Omer Lakomica (Translator).
  • Czech: Grey, Z., 1998. Ranč Majesty. Český Těšín: Oddych. Radomír Karas (Illustrator). Karel Chlouba (Translator).
  • German: Grey, Z., 1952. Majesty; München: AWA-Verl. Dr. Hansheinz Werner (Translator).
  • Hungarian: Grey, Z., 1990. Majesti tanyája. Budapest: Sprint. Pap László (Translator). (2011, Budapest: Fapadoskonyv.hu.
  • Italian: Grey, Z., 1961/1969. Il ranch di Majesty. Milano: Sonzogno. Agnese Silvestri Giorgi (Translator).
  • Norwegian: Grey, Z., 1974. Den fortapte ranchen. Oslo: Ingar Weyer Tveitan. Ulf Gleditsch (Translator). (1988, Fredhøi; 1997, Egmont bøker)
  • Spanish: Grey, Z., 1950. El rancho Majestad. Barcelona Bruguera, 1950. Luis Conde Vélez (Translator).

Bibliography

 

 
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Posted by on 2018-10-28 in Books

 

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Riders of the Purple Sage, 1986 Theatre Adaptation

In 1986 the Hip Pocket Theatre in Fort Worth, Texas filmed the premiere of their version of Riders of the Purple Sage. Based on the make-up the cast wears it seems likely that the theatre adaptation is partly based on the 1925 movie.

 

 

 
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Posted by on 2018-09-22 in Movies

 

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Riders of the Purple Sage, 2017 Western Opera adaptation

2017 Western Opera adaptation of Riders of the Purple Sage. Information from Arizona Opera.

Jane Withersteen, a devout Mormon woman, has inherited a sprawling ranch from her father. With all the wealth and power her ranch represents, Jane is under pressure from the church to marry Elder Tull and add her land, herd, and spring to the growing Mormon settlement of Short Creek. When Jane resists Tull’s advances, he resorts to threatening to whip her head rider, Venters, on a trumped-up charge. Lassiter, a mysterious gunman, arrives in time to save Venters and drive off the Mormons. Lassiter has come to see the grave of Milly Erne, who was a dear friend to Jane. He asks about Milly’s daughter, who was taken by the church when she was a baby. When rustlers steal one of Jane’s herds, Venters rides off to confront them, knowing the feared Masked Rider is among them. He wounds the Masked Rider, and is astonished to discover a girl named Bess beneath the rider’s mask…. (Arizona Opera)

Craig Bohmler, Composer

Steven Mark Kohn, adapted by Librettist

Ed Mell, Scenic Designer

Fenlon Lamb Fenlon Lamb, Stage Director

Joseph Mechavich Joseph Mechavich, Conductor

Krstin Atwell Ford Kristin Atwell Ford, Co-Producer

Karin Wolverton Karin Wolverton, Jane Withersteen

Laura Wilde Laura Wilde, Jane Withersteen

Morgan Smith Morgan Smith, Lassiter

Joshua Jeremiah Joshua Jeremiah, Lassiter

Joshua Dennis Joshua Dennis, Bern Venters

Amanda Opuszynski Amanda Opuszynski, Bess

Kristopher Irmiter Kristopher Irmiter, Bishop Dyer

Keith Phares Keith Phares, Elder Tull

Hugo Vera Hugo Vera, Judkins


Reviews:

 
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Posted by on 2018-09-16 in Movies

 

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Riders of the Purple Sage, 1996 film adaptation

… in 1871. Jane Withersteen, a Mormon-born spinster of 28, has inherited a valuable ranch and spring from her father, which is coveted by other Mormons in the community. When Jane refuses to marry one of the Mormon elders, Deacon Tull. He is angry at her because she has befriended Bern Venters, a young man who works on her ranch and whom she has saved from a brutal whipping at the hand of the Mormons, they begin to persecute her openly. Meanwhile, Lassiter, a notorious gunman, arrives at the Withersteen ranch in search of the grave of his long-lost sister, Millie Erne. It doesn’t take him long to see that this community is controlled by the corrupt Deacon Tull who is a powerful elder. He is trying to take Jane’s land by forcing her to marry him, by harassing Venters and by branding her foreman as a dangerous outsider. He ends up staying on as Jane’s defender while Venters is on the trail of a gang of cattle rustlers that includes a mysterious Masked Rider. Jane is eventually driven off her ranch as the persecution escalates, but she and Lassiter fall in love. Lassiter eventually solves the mystery of his sister’s death when Jane tells him the story of what happened to Millie, and they also discover that the masked rider is Bess, his niece. Tull, Pastor Dyer and the men riding with them are all killed, leaving Jane and Lassiter free to love each other. (RoTPS)

Reviews of the movie may be found on IMDB

Produced by Amer Productions, Rosemont Productions International and Zeke Productions

  • Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, David A. Rosemont, Thomas John Kane and Stella Theodoulou

Directed by Charles Haid

  • Craig West, David Fudge, Dirk Craft, Peggy Stuber

Adapted by Gill Dennis

Cast (in credits order):

Ed Harris Ed Harris …Jim Lassiter; Amy Madigan Amy Madigan …Jane Withersteen

Henry Thomas Henry Thomas …Bern Venters; Robin Tunney Robin Tunney …Elizabeth Erne

Norbert Weisser Norbert Weisser …Deacon Tull; G.D. Spradlin G.D. Spradlin …Pastor Dyer

Lynn Wanlass Lynn Wanlass …Hester Brandt; Bob L. Harris …Collier Brandt

Jerry Wills …Oldring; Rusty Musselman …Matthew Blake

Tom Bower Tom Bower …Judkins; Erin Neal …Background

Stunts by Alvin William ‘Dutch’ Lunak, Chris Branham, Fenton Quinn, Glade Quinn, Gwynn Turnbull Weaver, Jim Wilkey, Johnny Hock, Mark Warrick, Mike Watson, Monty Stuart, Rusty Hendrickson

Music by Arthur Kempel and Bill Purse

Cinematography and editing by William Wages and David Holden, Skip Adams, Amy Carey, LaReine Johnston, David D. Williams

Effects by

  • Thomas Fife, Mitchell Medford and Matt Vogel
  • John R. McConnell, Phillip O’Hanlon, Ray McIntyre Jr., and Reid Paul

Costume, Wardrobe and Make-up by

  • Durinda Wood
  • Cynthia D. Brenner, Bill Edwards, Judy Evers, Kris Hemenway and Amy J. Roberts
  • Richard Arias, Daniel Curet, Paul Huntley, Bren Plaistowe and  Jeffrey Sacino

Wranglers: Don Holyoak, Jesse Shepard, Joe Taylor and Rusty Hendrickson


Translated sub-titles and/or dubbing:

  • Austrian: Erbarmungslos und gefährlich
  • Brazilian Portugese: Cavaleiros do Crepúsuclo
  • Bulgarian: Ездачите от лилавите салвии
  • Finnish: Purppuratasangon ratsastajat
  • French: Les cavaliers de la mort
  • German: Lassiter – Erbarmungslos und gefährlich
  • Greek: I orgi tis moiras
  • Hungarian: Vadnyugati történet
  • Polish: Purpurowy jezdziec
  • Romanian: Secta profitorilor
  • Serbian: Veličanstveni jahači
  • Spanish: El jinete púrpura
  • Swedish: Viddernas ryttare
 
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Posted by on 2018-09-09 in Movies

 

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Riders of the Purple Sage, 1931 film adaptation

1931: Riders of the Purple Sage: Information from IMdB

A Remake of two earlier silent films … Seeking traces of his lost sister and her two young daughters, Jim Lassister reaches the Utah ranch of Jane Withersteen. He offers to help save Jane and her property from the depredations of a gang of crooked officials, organized under Judge Dyer. (Les Adams)

Produced by Fox Film Corporation

  • Edmund Grainger

Directed by Hamilton MacFadden

  • 2nd assistant director Earl Rettig

Adapted by Barry Conners, John F. Goodrich and Philip Klein

Cast:

George O'Brien George O’Brien …Jim Lassiter

Marguerite Churchill Marguerite Churchill …Jane Withersteen

Noah Beery Noah Beery …Judge Dyer

Yvonne Pelletier Yvonne Pelletier …Bess

James Todd …Vern Venters

Stanley Fields Stanley Fields …Oldring

Lester Dorr Lester Dorr …Judkins

Shirley Nail …Fay Larkin

Frank McGlynn Jr. Frank McGlynn Jr. …Adam Tull, Gang leader

Joe Brown …Bit Role

Dick Hunter …Rider

Cliff Lyons Cliff Lyons …Jed

Frank Meredith …Court Extra

Herman Nowlin …Rider

Vinegar Roan …Rider

Delmar Watson …Young Boy

Music by R.H. Bassett and Glen Knight

Cinematography by George Schneiderman

Costumes by Dolly Tree

Art by Don B. Greenwood

Stunts by Cliff Lyons

Presented by William Fox


Dubbed translations:

  • Austrian: Ritter der weiten Wüste
  • Brazilian Portugese: O Passo da Morte
  • Italian: L’amazzone mascherata
  • Portugese: O Salto Decisivo
  • Swedish: Den maskerade ryttaren
  • Ex-Yugoslavia Serbian: Jahaci rumene kadulje

Reviews:

 
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Posted by on 2018-09-02 in Movies

 

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Riders of the Purple Sage, 1925 film adaptation

1925 Riders of the Purple Sage: Information from IMdB

Riders of the Purple Sage is a 1925 American silent western film … the film is about a former Texas Ranger who pursues a corrupt lawyer who abducted his married sister and niece. His search leads him to a remote Arizona ranch and the love of a good woman. (Wikipedia)

Produced by Fox Films Corporation

Directed by Lynn Reynolds

Adapted by Edfrid A. Bingham

Cast:

Tom Mix Tom Mix …Jim Carson aka Jim Lassiter

Beatrice Burnham …Milly Erne

Arthur Morrison …Frank Erne

Warner Oland Warner Oland …Lew Walters aka Judge Dyer

Wilfred Lucas Wilfred Lucas …Oldring

Mabel Ballin …Jane Withersteen

Charles Le Moyne Charles Le Moyne …Richard Tull

Harold Goodwin Harold Goodwin …Bern Venters

Seessel Anne Johnson …Bess as a Child

Hank Bell Hank Bell …Barfly

Gary Cooper Gary Cooper …Rider

Mark Hamilton Mark Hamilton …Outlaw Mr. Tull’s Gang

Fred Kohler Fred Kohler …Henchman Tom Metzger

Charles Newton …Henchman Joe Herd

Marian Nixon Marian Nixon …Bess Erne

Joe Rickson …Henchman Dave Slack

Anne Shirley Anne Shirley …Fay Larkin

Cinematography by Daniel B. Clark

Costumes by Sam Benson

Music by composer William P. Perry

Presented by William Fox


Reviews:

Dubbed translations:

  • Austrian: Der Rächer/Die Todesreiter
  • Brazilan Portugese: O Passo da Morte
  • Finnish:
  • German: Der Rächer
  • French: Tom le vengeur
  • Hungarian: A legjobb rossz ember
  • Polish: Jezdzcy purpurowego stepu
 
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Posted by on 2018-08-26 in Movies

 

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The Border Legion, 1940 film adaptation

The Border Legion, 1940: Information from IMdB

Produced by Republic Pictures

  • Associate producer Joseph Kane

Directed by Joseph Kane

Adapted by Olive Cooper, Louis Stevens and George Carleton Brown

Cast:

Roy Rogers Roy Rogers …Dr. Stephen Kellogg, aka Steve Kells

George 'Gabby' Hayes George ‘Gabby’ Hayes …Honest John Whittaker

Carol Hughes Carol Hughes …Alice Randall

Joe Sawyer Joe/Joseph Sawyer …Jim Gulden

Maude Eburne Maude Eburne …Hurricane Hattie McGuire

Jay Novello Jay Novello …Santos

Hal Taliaferro Hal Taliaferro …Sheriff Amos Link

Dick Wessel Dick Wessel …Oscar Red McGooney

Paul Porcasi Paul Porcasi …Tony

Robert Emmett Keane Robert Emmett Keane …Willets

Eddie Acuff Eddie Acuff …Ticket Agent

Chuck Baldra …Townsman

Ed Brady Ed Brady …Gambler

Fred Burns …Miner

Bob Card Bob Card …Townsman

Spade Cooley Spade Cooley …Musician

Victor Cox …Barfly

Art Dillard …Saloon Patron

Curley Dresden …Miner

Joel Friedkin …Gus

Chick Hannan Chick Hannan …Henchman

Lew Kelly …Miner

Jack Kirk Jack Kirk …Jack

Cactus Mack Cactus Mack …Henchman

Ted Mapes Ted Mapes …Miner

Leo J. McMahon …Barfly

Art Mix Art Mix …Henchman

Monte Montague Monte Montague …Joe

Jack Montgomery Jack Montgomery …Henchman

Post Park …Henchman

Edward Peil Sr. Edward Peil Sr. …Barfly

Pascale Perry …Hank

Trigger Trigger …Steve’s Horse

Henry Wills Henry Wills …Miner

Bob Woodward Bob Woodward …Henchman

Music by Milton Rosen

  • Musical director Cy Feuer
  • Title music by William Lava
  • Stock music by Joseph Nussbaum

Cinematography by Jack A. Marta

  • Supervising editor Murray Seldeen
  • Editing by Edward Mann

Production Manager Al Wilson

Stunts by Yakima Canutt, Art Dillard, Ted Mapes, Leo J. McMahon, Jack Montgomery,  Post Park, Henry Wills, Bob Woodward, Bill Yrigoyen, Joe Yrigoyen


Reviews:


Subtitles/Dubbed translations:

  • Brazilian Portugese: Legião da Fronteira
  • Greek: Tromokratai ton synoron/Τρομοκράται τον συνόρων
 
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Posted by on 2018-08-19 in Movies

 

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Desert Gold, 1936 movie adaptation

 

1936: Desert Storm (Information from IMDB)

Plot: Chet Kasedon is after the Indians hidden gold mine but Chief Moya will not reveal it’s location. He has also hired mining engineers Gale and Mortimer to locate the mine. When Gale sees Kasedon’s cruelty to Moya, he switches sides. (IMDB)

Produced by Paramount Pictures

  • with Harold Hurley as producer,
  • and William T. Lackey as assistant producer.

Directed by James P. Hogan

  • Stanley Goldsmith as second assistant director

Adapted from Zane Grey’s novel “Desert Gold” (see my review) by Stuart Anthony and Robert Yost

Buster Crabbe Larry “Buster” Crabbe …Chief Moya

Tom Keene Tom Keene …Randolph Gale

Monte Blue Monte Blue …Chetley ‘Chet’ Kasedon

Marsha Hunt Marsha Hunt …Judy Belding

Robert Cummings Robert Cummings …Fordyce ‘Ford’ Mortimer

Raymond Hatton Raymond Hatton …Doc Belding

Frank Mayo Frank Mayo …Bert Lash – Henchman

Walter Miller Walter Miller …Hank Ladd – Henchman

Leif Erickson Leif (Glenn) Erickson …Glenn Kasedon
Billy Bletcher Billy Bletcher …Bob – a Wedding Guest

James P. Burtis …Sleeping Stage Passenger

Si Jenks Si Jenks …Stage Driver Bert

Willis Marks …J.T. Winters – Assayer

Robert McKenzie Robert McKenzie …Wedding Guest Serving Punch

John Merkyl John Merkyl …Tribal Elder

Art Mix Art Mix …Henchman

Philip Morris …Sentry
Gertrude Simpson …Wedding Guest
Ed Thorpe …Indian
Anders Van Haden …Tribal Elder

Cinematography by George T. Clemens

Film Editing by Chandler House

Art by Hans Dreier and David S. Garber

  • Set Decoration by A.E. Freudeman

Sound by Walter Oberst (recordist)

  • Adolph Zukor (presenter)

Translations:

  • Danish: Kampen om guldminen
  • Portugese: Roubada a Tempo

Reviews:

 
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Posted by on 2018-07-29 in Movies

 

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Wildfire: 1949 film-adaptation

Red Canyon, 1949: Information from IMDB

Red Canyon was one of several medium-budget, Technicolor westerns turned out by Universal-International between 1949 and 1959. Howard Duff plays wandering cowpoke Lin Sloane, who spends most of the film trying to capture a fabled wild stallion. While thus occupied, he finds time to romance Lucy Bostel (Ann Blyth), daughter of the region’s most influential horsebreeder (George Brent). Conflicts arise when Lucy intends to race the captured stallion, much to the dismay of her father; there’s also a major brouhaha involving Sloane’s disreputable family heritage. Red Canyon was adapted by Maurice Geraghty from a rugged novel by Zane Grey. (Film Affinity)

Produced by Universal International Pictures (Gilbert Kurland)

  • Producer Leonard Goldstein
  • Assistant producer Aaron Rosenberg

Directed by George Sherman

  • Assistant director John Sherwood

Screenplay adaptation by Maurice Geraghty

  • Supervised by Pat Betz

Ann Blyth Ann Blyth …Lucy Bostel

Howard Duff Howard Duff …Lin Sloane

George Brent George Brent …Matthew Bostel

Edgar Buchanan Edgar Buchanan …Jonah Johnson

John McIntire John McIntire …Floyd Cordt

Chill Wills Chill Wills …Marshal G.T. Brackton

Jane Darwell Jane Darwell …Aunt Jane

Lloyd Bridges Lloyd Bridges …Virgil Cordt

James Seay James Seay …Joel Creech

Edmund MacDonald Edmund MacDonald …Farlane

David Clarke David Clarke …Sears

Denver Pyle Denver Pyle …Hutch

Willard W. Willingham …Van

Ray Bennett Ray Bennett …Pronto

Johnny Carpenter …Townsman

Sonny Chorre …Indian

Edmund Cobb Edmund Cobb …Townsman

Tex Cooper Tex Cooper …Party Guest

Highland Dale …Black Velve

Mike Donovan …Party Guest

Slim Gaut …Townsman

Jack Kenny Jack Kenny …Townsman

Ethan Laidlaw Ethan Laidlaw …Ranch Hand

Hank Patterson Hank Patterson …Osborne

Phil Schumacher …Party Guest

Charles Soldani Charles Soldani …Indian

Hank Worden Hank Worden …Charley

Art by Bernard Herzbrun and Frank A. Richards

  • Sets by Russell A. Gausman and Joseph Kish

Camera and cinematography by Irving Glassberg, Everett Brown, Lloyd Hill, Eddie Jones and Richard Towers

  • Editing by Otto Ludwig
  • Colours by William Fritzsche and Natalie Kalmus

Music by Walter Scharf

  • Flute by Ethmer Roten
  • Sound by Leslie I. Carey and Vernon W. Kramer

Costume and Makeup by Rosemary Odell and Carmen Dirigo, Bud Westmore, Emmy Eckhardt and John G. Holden

Horse trainers Lester Hilton and Ralph McCutcheon

Stunts by Johnny Carpenter, Jackie Hamblin, Whitey Hughes and Phil Schumacher

Foreign sub-titles:

  • Austrian: Die rote Schlucht
  • Belgian: Le roi de la vallée
  • Brazil Portugese: Escrava do Ódio
  • Dutch: De Strijd in ‘t rotsgebergte
  • German: Hurrikan (TV) / Die rote Schlucht
  • Danish: De vilde hestes konge
  • Spanish: Huracán
  • Finnish: Tuliharja
  • French: Le mustang noir
  • Greek: Sto farángi tou trómou / Στο φαράγγι του τρόμου
  • Italian: Figlio del delitto
  • Portugese: Sangue Ardente
  • Swedish: De vilda hästarnas dal

Reviews:

  • Fred Blosser: Handsomely mounted and well acted, “Red Canyon” is an engaging, unpretentious tale about second chances that should be better known than it is.”
  • French forum for Western films: “Le jeu des acteurs secondaires est assez intéressant avec un (court) duo étonnant à l’écran : Chill Wills et Edgar Buchanan.”
  • Greenbriars Picture Shows: “… this was among loveliest-shot westerns the decade offered.”
  • James D’Arc: “School was cancelled and workers left their daily labor when Kanab locals were needed to get into costume and become a crowd at the Kanab Race Track for the horse-racing scenes …”
  • Jacqueline T. Lynch (Wonderful review): “Buchanan’s speech is so tangled up in the most outlandish and complicated blustering euphemisms that I’m surprised he could remember half his lines.  I’d love to see the outtakes; they’re real tongue-twisters and he had to have messed up sometimes.”
  • Once upon a time in a Western: “One of the better scenes is watching little Lucy’s reaction as she opens her birthday present from her dad, and finds it complete with corset, bustle and other female do-dads.”
  • Robert Cornell: “Only Chill Will’s typical character acting distinguishes this very minor and rather childish western.”
  • Scott O’Brien: “… Bostel mistakenly buys Lucy a frilly frock for her eighteenth birthday. He may as well have given her a cow pie.”
  • T.M.P., New York Times: “While “Red Canyon” is not a picture to create any special enthusiasm, it runs its course in agreeable enough fashion.”

 

 
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Posted by on 2018-07-22 in Movies

 

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Drift Fence, 1936 film adaptation

Drift Fence (my book-review): Information from IMDB

Produced by Paramount Pictures, Harold Hurley, William T. Lackey and Henry Herzbrun

Directed by Otho Lovering

Adapted by Robert Yost and Stuart Anthony

Cast:
Buster Crabbe Larry “Buster” Crabbe …Slinger Dunn

Katherine DeMille Katherine DeMille …Molly Dunn

Tom Keene Tom Keene …Jim Travis

Benny Baker Benny Baker …Jim Traft

Leif Erickson Glenn “Leif” Erickson …Curley Prentiss

Stanley Andrews Stanley Andrews …Clay Jackson

Effie Ellsler …Granny Dunn

Richard Carle Richard Carle …Sheriff Bingham

Jan Duggan Jan Duggan …Carrie Bingham

Irving Bacon Irving Bacon …Windy Watkins, Traft Foreman

Richard Alexander Richard Alexander …Henchman Seth Haverly

Budd Fine …Henchman Sam Haverly

Walter Long Walter Long …Bev Wilson

Curley Baldwin …Man at Dance

Ed Brady Ed Brady …Jackson Henchman

Charles Brinley Charles Brinley …Barfly

Jack Rube Clifford …Rodeo Announcer

Chester Gan Chester Gan …Clarence

Frank O'Connor Frank O’Connor …Bartender at Mace’s Saloon

Jack Pennick …Weary

Bob Reeves Bob Reeves …Henchman

Don Roberts …Guncheck Room Clerk

Henry Roquemore …Rodeo Judge

Tom Smith Tom Smith …Man at Dance

Cinematography by Virgil Miller

Film Editing by Everett Douglas

Art Direction by Hans Dreier and David S. Garber

Set Decoration by A.E. Freudeman

Sound recording by John Cope and Charles Hisserich

Composed by John Leipold and Ralph Rainger

Presented by Adolph Zukor

 
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Posted by on 2018-07-15 in Movies

 

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The Call of the Canyon, 1923 film-clip

The Call of the Canyon (1923)

Glenn Kilbourne (Richard Dix) returns from the war and travels to Arizona to regain his health. There he is nursed back to health by an Arizona girl, Flo Hutter (Marjorie Daw). Kilbourne’s fiancée, Carley Burch (Lois Wilson), arrives in Arizona but soon becomes disillusioned with life in the West and returns to New York. Sometime later, Flo is seriously injured in an accident. Wanting to repay her for restoring him back to health, Glenn asks her to marry him. On their wedding day, Carley returns to Arizona from New York looking for Glenn. When Flo sees that Glenn and Carley are still in love, she calls off her wedding to Glenn and marries another admirer, Lee Stanton (Leonard Clapham). (Wikipedia)

Directed by Victor Fleming
Written by Zane Grey, Adapted by Edfrid A. Bingham and Doris Schroeder

Produced by Paramount Pictures

Cast (in credits order) complete, awaiting verification
Richard Dix Richard Dix… Glenn Kilbourne
Lois Wilson Lois Wilson…Carley Burch
Marjorie Daw Marjorie Daw …Flo Hunter

Noah Beery Noah Beery …Haze Ruff

Ricardo Cortez Ricardo Cortez …Larry Morrison

Fred Huntley …Tom Hutter

Lillian Leighton Lillian Leighton …Mrs. Hutter

Helen Dunbar Helen Dunbar …Aunt Mary

Tom London Tom London …Lee Stanton (as Leonard Clapham)

Eddie Clayton …Tenney Jones (as Edward Clayton)

Dorothy Seastrom Dorothy Seastrom …Eleanor Harmon

Laura Anson …Beatrice Lovell

Charles Richards …Roger Newton

Ralph Yearsley …Charlie Oatmeal

Arthur Rankin Arthur Rankin …Virgil Rust

Mervyn LeRoy Mervyn LeRoy …Jack Rawlins

Cinematography by James Wong Howe

Props by Henry Hathaway

Costume and Wardrobe by Mervyn LeRoy

Presented by Jesse L. Lasky

 
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Posted by on 2018-07-02 in Movies

 

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West of the Pecos, 1945 filmadaptation

West of the Pecos, 1945. Information from IMDB

“Heading west for his health, Colonel Lambeth takes his daughter Rill along. Lost on the desert they are saved by Pecos and Chito. The Colonel hires the two and the Lambeths soon find themselves mixed up in Pecos’ trouble. Pecos has killed Sawtelle’s brother and Sawtelle as head of the vigilantes is after him.” (Maurice VanAuken)

Produced by RKO Radio Pictures

  • Executive producer Sid Rogell
  • Producer Herman Schlom

Directed by Edward Killy

  • Assistant director Harry Mancke

Adapted by Norman Houston

Robert Mitchum Robert Mitchum …Pecos Smith

Barbara Hale Barbara Hale …Rill Lambeth

Richard Martin Richard Martin …Chito Rafferty

Thurston Hall Thurston Hall …Colonel Lambeth

Rita Corday Rita Corday …Suzanne

Russell Hopton Russell Hopton …Jeff Slinger

Bill Williams Bill Williams …Stage Guard Tex

Bruce Edwards Bruce Edwards …Clyde Corbin

Harry Woods Harry Woods …Brad Sawtelle

Perc Launders …Sam Sawtelle

Bryant Washburn Bryant Washburn …Doc Howard

Philip Morris …U.S. Marshal

Martin Garralaga Martin Garralaga …Don Manuel

Robert Andersen Robert Andersen …Gambler

Alfredo Berumen …Alfredo

Eumenio Blanco …Party Guest

Sammy Blum …Gambler

Archie Butler …Vigilante

Italia DeNubila …Dancer

John Eberts …Party Guest

Jack Gargan …Ed – The Bartender

Edmund Glover Edmund Glover …Undetermined

Carmen Grenada …Spanish Girl

Herman Hack Herman Hack …Gambler

Carl Kent Carl Kent …Undetermined

Ethan Laidlaw Ethan Laidlaw …Vigilante Henchman

Allan Lee …Four-Up Driver

Frank O'Connor Frank O’Connor …Vigilante

Cliff Parkinson …Vigilante

Jose Portugal …Party Guest

Paul Ravel …Party Guest

Joe Rickson …Joe – Townsman

Jason Robards Sr. Jason Robards Sr. …Undetermined

Robert Robinson …Townsman

Ariel Sherry …Mexican Girl

Jack Tornek Jack Tornek …Townsman

Virginia Wave …Mexican Girl

Larry Wheat Larry Wheat …Butler

Henry Wills Henry Wills …Vigilante

Art by Lucius O. Croxton and Albert S. D’Agostino

  • Set decoration by Darrell Silvera and William Stevens

Cinematography by Harry J. Wild

  • On second camera Charles Straumer

Music composed by Paul Sawtell

  • Music directed by C. Bakaleinikoff
  • Mixed by Earl B. Mounce
  • Sounds created by John E. Tribby
  • Sound recordings by Terry Kellum

Costume Design by Renié (Irene Brouillet)

Film Editing by Roland Gross

Stunts by Henry Wills


Dubbed foreign editions:

  • Brazilian Portugese: A Oeste de Pecos
  • French: A l’Ouest du Pecos
  • Italian: Bella Aventura
  • Spanish: La gran aventura
 
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Posted by on 2018-06-28 in Movies

 

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The Arizona Raiders, 1936 film adaptation

The Arizona Raiders, 1936

Laramie Nelson (Buster Crabbe) falsely accused of horse-stealing, is about to be strung up by a posse when a sudden lurch of his horse knocks down his would-be executioners, and he makes his escape. He soon comes upon another hanging posse and saves “Honest” Tracks Williams (Raymond Hatton), accused of a long, long list of minor crimes, and the two ride off together. They come to a small Arizona town, and their first encounter is with attorney Monroe Adams (Grant Withers) and his client, Harriet Lindsay (Marsha Hunt), owner of the large, prosperous Spanish Peaks ranch. Harriet and Adams have come to town to stop the marriage of her young sister, Lenta (Betty Jane Rhodes), to shy young Alonzo “Lonesome” Mulhall (Johnny Downs). They are successful, and Alonzo is jailed, along with Tracks, following his attempt to shoot up the town. Tracks offers to arrange an elopement for Alonzo as soon as they are out of jail. Laramie gets them out of jail ahead of schedule by stampeding a herd of … Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Directed by James P. Hogan

Adapted from Zane Grey’s “Raiders of Spanish Peaks” by Robert Yost and John W. Krafft

Cast (in credits order)

Buster Crabbe Buster Crabbe Laramie Nelson (as Larry Crabbe)
Raymond Hatton Raymond Hatton Tracks Williams
Marsha Hunt Marsha Hunt Harriett Lindsay
Betty Jane Rhodes Betty Jane Rhodes Lenta Lindsay (as Jane Rhodes)
Johnny Downs Johnny Downs Lonesome Alonzo Q. Mulhall
Grant Withers Grant Withers Monroe Adams, Harriett’s lawyer
Don Rowan Henchman Luke Arledge
Arthur Aylesworth Arthur Aylesworth Andy Winthrop
Richard Carle Richard Carle Boswell Albernathy, Justice of the Peace
Petra Silva Tiny – the Maid
Ken Cooper Ken Cooper Lynch Mob Member
Augie Gomez Cowboy
Spike Spackman Cowboy
James P. Burtis Second Sheriff at Hanging (uncredited)
Bob Card Bob Card Deputy (uncredited)
Herbert Heywood First Sheriff at Hanging (uncredited)
Billy Lee Billy Lee Little Boy (uncredited)

Produced by A.M. Botsford and Daniel Keefe
Cinematography by Leo Tover
Film Editing by Chandler House
Art Direction by Hans Dreier and Robert Odell
Set Decoration by interior decorator A.E. Freudeman
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director Harry Scott
Sound Department by sound recordists Charles Hisserich and Don Johnson
Stunts by Ken Cooper and Spike Spackman
Composed by Gerard Carbonara, Hugo Friedhofer, Sigmund Krumgold, John Leipold and Heinz Roemheld
Presenter Adolph Zukor

 
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Posted by on 2018-06-24 in Movies

 

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Raiders of Spanish Peaks, 1931

“Raiders of the Spanish Peaks” first saw light of day in December 1931 as a serial in the recently established magazine “Country Gentleman”. It ran as a six-part story until May 1932. Then, in 1938 it was published by Harper & Bros. Later it reappeared in Zane Grey’s Western Magazine 4(5) in 1950 and as a Dell picturized edition called “The Rustlers” in 1954.

Zane Grey always has a theme for his historical romances. He tries to keep them true to the times, using historical people and places to emphasize his messages. Charles “Buffalo” Jones conveys the importance of understanding stories from its time and place in history. He also tries to convey the idea that all stories have two sides to them. “Raiders of the Spanish Peaks” is set to the 1880s in Kansas and Colorado. At that time Comanchee, Ute, Kiowa and Arapaho tribes were still being removed from lands wanted by cattle ranchers into reservations. Jones refers to one of the darkest times in the history in the US, a time described well in Zane Grey’s “The Thundering Herd“.

Character-wise Grey likes to use men and women (often tenderfeet) who grow into his ideal westerner (see “Code of the West“). “Raiders of Spanish Peaks” is no different in that regard. There are two main characters (Laramie Nelson and Harriet Lindsay) and two secondary characters (Lonesome Mulhall and Lenta Lindsay). Other semi-important ones are Ted Williams, Florence Lindsay, Neale Lindsay, Lester Allen, Luke Arlidge and Mr. and Mrs. Lindsay. “Raiders of Spanish Peaks” starts with Laramie Nelson’s story.

LARAMIE’S horse went lame, and as Wingfoot was the only living creature he had to care for, he halted at midday, without thought of his own needs.

After one too many gun-plays Laramie felt the need to leave a certain Kansas Ranch behind (along with Luke Arlidge). He is a 25-year old Texan gun-slinger and grubrider (a cowhand riding from ranch to ranch finding whatever work was available). With him went his horse, saddle and tack, wool-blanket, canteen, gun and saddlebag. He and Wingfoot found themselves in an idyllic valley in southern central Kansas. He woke to the sound of men up to no good.

“Thet’s my answer, Mulhall,” replied Price, curtly. “I’ll tell somebody yu took yore medicine yellow.”

“——!” burst out the bound rider, furiously. “I knowed it. Yu’re hangin’ me ’cause she has no use fer yu. . . . Go ahead an’ string me up yu ——! . . . She’ll be onto yu. Hank or Bill will give yu away some day. An’ she’ll hate yu——”

“Shet up,” snapped Price, jerking the lasso so tight round Mulhall’s neck as to cut short his speech and sway him in the saddle.

Which is how Laramie and “Lonesome” Mulhall come to ride together. Lonesome has two weaknesses that keep on getting him into trouble. The first he shares with Zane Grey (according to his biographies), women. Lonesome (16) loves them and they love him right back. The second is the itch to acquire whatever is not tied down. Laramie is lonely, and has hopes of Lonesome growing up, so he invites Lonesome along.

They ride into a newish Dodge City to stock up on hardtack, they run into the final member of their threesome: Ted “Track” Williams (19). He is stuck in jail and wants the two to spring him.

“Sheriff and his deputies made a raid to lock up a lot of newcomers. And I happened to be one.”

Times being what they were, Lonesome and Laramie decide to go fulfill his request, and that night the threesome becomes “The Three Range Riders”.

“Laramie’s fame with a gun, Williams’ as a tracker, Lonesome’s irresistible attraction and weakness for women, preceded them in many instances, and in all soon discovered them.”

The three of them could not be parted. If one was hired, all had to be hired. If one was let go, the other two left as well. Jobs weren’t easy to come but Laramie kept the two others in line as much as possible.

… the frontier was changing from the bloody Indian wars and buffalo massacres a few years back to the cattle regime and the development of the rustler. For young men the life grew harder, for not only did the peril to existence increase, but also the peril of moral ruin. The gambler, the prostitute, the rustler, the desperado, the notoriety-seeking, as well as the real gunman, followed hard on the advent of the stock-raising.

Laramie prayed for a miracle. The Three Range Riders decide to give the straight and narrow one more try and come to Garden city. Once the pesky tribes had been driven off, the Fulton brothers laid claim to large sections of the townsite. It is here that Laramie finds a solution to their needs.

Laramie strode on until he came to a pretentious hotel, and was entering the lobby, followed by his reluctant and grumbling partners, when suddenly he was halted by a man.

“Look out, Lonesome! Duck!” called Tracks, who was ahead.

But the Westerner with the broad-brimmed sombrero let out a whoop.

Laramie! . . . By the Lord Harry, where’d you come from?”

Quick as a flash Laramie recognized the lean, lined, tanned face with its gray eyes of piercing quality.

“Buffalo Jones or I’m a daid sinner! I shore am glad to meet yu heah.”

The story then changes POV to the Lindsay family. John Lindsay is an “iron-gray-haired man of fifty years, and of fine appearance except for an extreme pallor which indicated a tubercular condition”. He had left Upper Sandusky, OH, with his family to find himself a better climate. His family insisted they go with him  so Lindsay sold everything they had. We first meet the family in Garden City at the Elk Hotel. Mrs. NN Lindsay is an anxious person who likes to entertain. His oldest daughter is Harriet “Hallie/Hal” (25), his accountant, financial advisor and money handler and “the sanity and strength of this family“. Florence (19) is the beauty of the family and concerned with beautiful things. Neale (18) is the only boy and his mother’s favourite. Lenta (16) is the most spirited and adventuresome of the four.

John Lindsay bought Spanish Peaks Ranch (“…an old fort. Built by trappers who traded with the Utes an’ Kiowas. There’s a fine spring comes right up inside the patio an’ some big cottonwoods…“) along with 10000 heads of cattle from Lester Allen. Allen told them he would  leave a crew led by his foreman, Luke Arlidge. Harriet was not impressed with either of them. All of them were, however, impressed with the man their father brought the next day. Charles “Buffalo” Jones brought with him stories about his life and warnings about what might be waiting considering the reputation of Allen and Arlidge. A few of days later he introduced Lindsay to The Three Range Riders, who agreed to be hired by him.

The rest of “Raiders of Spanish Peaks” continues to change between Laramie and Harriet’s experiences as they travel to the ranch, what they discover when they get there, and the tough and rewarding life waiting for them all. Some parts are really funny, some are tense, some are romantic (in the Jane Austen sense). As with all of his stories, nature also is also a character in “Raiders of Spanish Peaks“.

Gray-sloped, twin-peaked, snow-capped mountains apparently loomed right over her. These must be the Spanish Peaks from which the ranch derived its name. They were her first sight of high mountains and the effect seemed stunning. But they were only a beginning. Beyond rose a wall of black and white which she had imagined was cloud. Suddenly she realized that she was gazing at the magnificent eastern front of the Rocky Mountains. Pure and white, remote and insurmountable, rose the glistening peaks high into the blue sky, and then extended, like the teeth of a saw, beyond her range of vision.

Harriet stared. Greater than amaze and ecstasy something had birth in her. The thing she had waited for all her life seemed to be coming—the awakening of a deeper elementary self. A vague, sweet, intangible feeling of familiarity smote her. But where and when could she ever have seen such a glorious spectacle? Perhaps pictures haunted her. This scene, however, was vivid, real, marvelous, elevating. Lonely and wild and grand—this Colorado!

I think Zane Grey probably had fun with Mulhall’s character. There is a couple of conversations between Laramie and Lonesome about women that may have shocked some readers. His fans were mainly Euro-Americans. That may also be true of most of today’s fans. I would guess that today’s target groups for Zane Grey, and “Raiders of Spanish Peaks“, consist of Western fans and fans of US historical authors.

Free read at Roy Glashan’s library


Translations

  • Audiobook narrated by John McLain
  • Croatian. Jahači španjolskih planina. Translated by Boris Gerechtshammer. Rijeka: Otokar Keršovani, 1963.
  • Czech. Pistolníci ze Španělských hor. Translated by Josef Vorel. V Praze: Novina, 1939.
  • Finnish. Yöllinen hyökkäys. Kymmenen markan romaaneja 161. Translated by Tauno Nuotio. WSOY, 1939.
  • German. Die Unzertrennlichen. Translated by Dr. Franz Eckstein. Berlin: Verlag Th. Knaur Nachf., 1939.
  • Norwegian. Oppgjørets time. Translated by Ulf Gleditch. Oslo: Egmont Forlag, 1989
  • Portugese. Três cavaleiros da planície. Translated by Raúl Correia. Lisboa: Ag. Port. de Revistas, [19-?]
  • Spanish. Los incursores de la pradera. Translated by . México, D.F., Editorial Diana, 1967.
 
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Posted by on 2018-06-14 in Books

 

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West of the Pecos; New York, The American Magazine, 1931

Illustrated by Frank Hoffman

West of the Pecos was first published as a 7-episode serial in The American Magazine from August of 1931 to February of 1932. In 1937 Harper & Brothers published the story as an action romance. The Zane Grey’s Western Magazine published West of the Pecos in 1947 and again in 1954. The main characters are Pecos Smith and Terrill (Rill) Lambeth with Sambo as supporting character. As usual, nature plays an important role displaying Pecos River, Horsehead Crossing and Langtry around 1865-1871 (ZGWS). A free copy is available in Roy Glashan‘s library.

“When Templeton Lambeth’s wife informed him that if God was good they might in due time expect the heir he had so passionately longed for, he grasped at this with the joy of a man whose fortunes were failing, and who believed that a son might revive his once cherished dream of a new and adventurous life on the wild Texas ranges west of the Pecos River.

That very momentous day he named the expected boy Terrill Lambeth, for a beloved brother. Their father had bequeathed to each a plantation; one in Louisiana, and the other in eastern Texas. Terrill had done well with his talents, while Templeton had failed.

The baby came and it was a girl. This disappointment was the second of Lambeth’s life, and the greater. Lambeth never reconciled himself to what he considered a scurvy trick of fate. He decided to regard the child as he would a son, and to bring her up accordingly. He never changed the name Terrill. And though he could not help loving Terrill as a daughter, he exulted in her tomboy tendencies and her apparently natural preferences for the rougher and more virile pleasures and occupations. Of these he took full advantage.”

Zane Grey was known for thorough research for his stories and appropriately portrayed characters according to each storyline’s class, gender and color. In West of the Pecos we find ourselves in Texas before and after the war between Southern and Northern states. Texas never experienced the major invasions that other Southern states did. Shortages of essentials like food, medication and paper was extensive because essentials went to the army. To support the war, new property-, poll-, income- and distilling taxes were imposed. Refugees started arriving and wounded men returned. Crime rose and sometimes these were answered with lynchings. Since most white men, like Lambeth, joined the army, women took over the running of most facets of life. Many cotton plantations were not as affected as other industries (TSLAC). However, the Lambeth women experienced hardship, and their slaves probably felt the increasing lack of ready income the most. When the war ended, Lambeth returned a widower with a fifteen year old daughter (Rill) to provide for and a plantation he no longer wants to run.

West of the Pecos is about gender differences, how Texans viewed African-Americans, crime as a consequence of the war, poverty and not giving up. It’s probably one of my favourite Zane Grey action romances. The action is excellent. As usual nature plays a vital part. The romance between Rill and Pecos ends in the usual manner. I believe in Rill’s character more than Pecos’. Both Rill and Pecos talk down to Sambo, but Pecos is probably Grey’s representative for the Southern view of African-Americans:

Pecos Smith had known negro slaves as worthy as any white man, though he had the Southerner’s contempt for most of the black trash.

Lambeth sold the plantation and tries to fulfill his dreams. “He had a vision and it could not be clouded.” All of the slaves are freed, but two of them get hired as vaquero (Sambo) and cook (Mauree) for the outfit. They have a wagon stuffed with provisions and several horses. Upon leaving eastern Texas, Lambeth insists that Rill take on the role as a boy and forget whatever she had learned about being a woman. This is a strategic move on Lambeth’s part. Not only that, but according to the laws of Texas Lambeth owned Rill so she had little say in what happened to her. He explained to Rill that given where they were going, being a boy and vaquero was safer than being a girl. That was truth.

West of the Pecos is divided into three parts. First we have the journey of the Lambeths from eastern Texas to West of the Pecos.You can follow the route Lambeth, Rill, Sambo and Mauree travel. First they go through Austin to San Antonio/Alamo (where Rill meets Pecos for the first time). After San Antonio they join a group of buffalo hunters and go northwest of Colorado River to kill buffalo. Rill, Sambo and Mauree have an exciting first buffalo experience:

…The streams of buffalo had closed in solid and were now scarcely a hundred yards from the wagons. The black and tawny beasts appeared to bob up and down in unison. Dust rolled up yellow and thick, obscuring farther view. Behind, the gap was filling up with a sea of lifting hoofs and shaggy heads. It was thrilling to Terrill, though her heart came up in her throat. The rumble had become a trampling roar. She saw that Sambo’s idea was to keep his big wagon behind Mauree’s smaller one, and try to run with the beasts, hoping they would continue to split behind it. But how long could the horses keep that gait up, even if they did not bolt and leave the wagons to be crushed? Terrill had heard of whole caravans being flattened out and trodden into the plain. Dixie’s ears were up, his eyes wild. But for Terrill’s presence right close, holding his bridle, he would have run away.

Soon Terrill became aware that the teams were no longer keeping up with the buffalo. That lumbering lope had increased to a gallop, and the space between the closing lines of buffalo had narrowed to half what it had been. Terrill saw with distended eyes those shaggy walls converging. There was no gap behind Sambo’s wagon—only a dense, gaining, hairy mass. Sambo’s eyes rolled till the whites stood out. He was yelling to his horses, but Terrill could not hear a word.

The trampling roar seemed engulfed in deafening thunder. The black bobbing sea of backs swallowed up the open ground till Terrill could have tossed her sombrero upon the shaggy humps. She saw no more flying legs and hoofs. When she realized that the increased pace, the change from a tame lope to a wild gallop, the hurtling of the blind horde, meant a stampede and that she and the two negroes were in the midst of it, she grew cold and sick with terror. They would be lost, smashed to a pulp. She shut her eyes to pray, but she could not keep them shut.

Next she discovered that Mauree’s team had bolted. The wagon kept abreast of the beasts. It swayed and jolted, almost throwing Terrill out. Dixie had to run to keep up. Sambo’s team came on grandly, tongues out, eyes like fire, still under control. Then Terrill saw the negro turn to shoot back at the charging buffalo. The red flame of the gun appeared to burst right in the faces of the maddened beasts. They thundered forward, apparently about to swarm over the wagon.

Clamped with horror, hanging on to the jolting wagon, Terrill saw the buffalo close in alongside the very wheels. A shroud of dust lifted, choking and half blinding her. Sambo blurred in her sight, though she saw the red spurt of his gun. She heard no more. Her eyes seemed stopped. She was an atom in a maelstrom. The stench of the beasts clogged her nostrils. A terrible sense of being carried along in a flood possessed her. The horses, the wagons, were keeping pace with the stampede. Dixie leaped frantically, sometimes narrowly missing the wagon. Just outside the wheels, rubbing them, swept huge, hairy, horned monsters that surely kept him running straight.

After a successful hunt, the Lambeths travelled to Maynardsville (Manard) by the San Saba River where Lambeth picks up Texas long-horns and two helpers. The crew continues via the southern edge of L’lano Estacado across the Staked Plains. They become lost and much of the cattle died of thirst. Fortunately, they stumbled upon the Flat Rock Water Holes. After that, they almost died again before they found Wild China Water Holes. Another near death experience almost happened. This time they were saved by Pecos Smith who took them to Horsehead Crossing. The entire journey took eight months, leaving the all four honed for the lives they were about to enter.

In the second part of West of the Pecos, Pecos Smith was the main character. He had

… flaxen hair and he wore it so long that it curled from under his sombrero. His face was like a bronze mask, except when he talked or smiled, and then it lightened. In profile it was sharply cut, cold as stone, singularly more handsome than the full face. His eyes assumed dominance over all other features, being a strange-flecked, pale gray, of exceeding power of penetration. His lips, in repose, were sternly chiseled, almost bitter, but as they were mostly open in gay, careless talk or flashing a smile over white teeth, this last feature was seldom noticed….He was an honest person.

Due to circumstances, Pecos ended up in the same area as Rill. We now enter the third part of West of the Pecos. After he saved fifteen year old (he thought) Rill, Pecos became Rill’s partner. Both wanted to get back at the people who had made their lives much more miserable. War messes people up. Especially on the side that “lost”. Grey has written a story that addresses the times and its prejudices and challenges. As usual, he brings nature to life with accurate descriptions. Yes. Pecos River country really was that harsh.


Reviews:


Translations:

  • Audiobook: Narrated by Eric G. Glove; Brilliance Audio, 2017
  • Afrikaans: Wes van die Pecos; Afrikaanse Pers-Boekhandel, 1956
  • Croatian: Zapadno od Pecosa; Translated by Omer Lakomica; Rijeka, Otokar Keršovani, 1961/1985
  • Czech: Na západ od Pekosu; Translated by Josef Vorel/Jan Hora; V Praze, Novina, 1938; Illustrated by Václav Kotrch 1938
  • Finnish: Texasin tyttö; WSOY, 1944
    • Pecos-joelta länteen; Taikajousi, 1982
  • German: Männer aus Texas; Translated by Franz Eckstein; Berlin: Knaur, 1938
  • Italian: A occidente del Pecos; Translated by Rossana De Michele; Milano, Sonzogno, 1969
  • Norwegian: Vest for Pecos; Translated by Paul Evan; Romanforlaget, 1962
  • Spanish: Al Oeste Del Pecos; Traducción, Luis Conde Vélez, Círculo de Lectores, 1966

Sources

 
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Posted by on 2018-02-18 in Books

 

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Meyer, W.E.H. Jr. Zane Grey and the American, Hypervisual Tradition

West Fork Trail, AZ; Credit: Michael D. McCumber

Meyer Jr., W. E. H. (1989), Zane Grey and the American, Hypervisual Tradition. Journal of American Culture, 12: 59–69. doi: 10.1111/j.1542-734X.1989.1204_59.x

Her vaunted images of European scenery changed to operetta settings.

She had nothing with which to compare this illimitable space.

«Oh!-America!» was her unconscious tribute.
The Call of the Canyon

Zane Grey cannot be treated as simply a «popular» or «Western» author because his novels deal too intimately with the Sight-Geist of American literary tradition. From the Puritans to the present day, American art and life have defined themselves according to Emerson’s ecstatic «transparent eyeball» and the bold assumption that we had «listened too long to the courtly muses of Europe» because the New World explorer no longer wished to hear but to see for himself – what Emerson summed up as our «genius in America, with tyrannous eye» (Poet 238) and what Zane Grey likewise intuits in the eye-dealism of his fiction in the anti-verbal, anti-civilized hypervisuality, for example of Rogue River Feud:

Out there in what they call civilization I see and I think. Here I see, but don’t think. (148)

Grey’s novels, in fact, are all allegories of Hawthorne’s great Aesthetic American Adultery, of the hypervisual brand on every New-World human breast and cattle’s flank – of the traumatic but Sanative power of the Melvillean «A sharp eye for the White Whale» (Moby-Dick, 121). And because Grey’s novels not only vie with the greatest of American writers in extolling our «Democratic Vistas» but often excel Whitman’s or Wolfe’s «bright panoramas» or «distant soaring ranges» (Look Homeward, 522), this «popular» culturalist must be seen and taken seriously in his proper New-World context – the same passionate context and conviction that led a contemporary, F. Scott Fitzgerald, to laud the «fresh, green breast of the new world … that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes» (Gatsby 182).

All in all, Zane Grey has accepted as ambitious a «literary» challenge as any novelist of modern times – the elevation, reconstitution and conservation of his country’s highest ideals, it anti-verbal, hypervisual aspirations:

He saw thought and soul and nature – strong vision of life. (Riders 198)

 
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Posted by on 2017-10-12 in About Zane Grey

 

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The Lost Wagon Train (1936)

Cover illustration by Harrison Fisher

The Lost Wagon Train came about because the Depression of the 1930’s forced Zane Grey to face that one cannot keep on spending money without having some to spend. Cosmopolitan Magazine published the serial “The Lost Wagon Train” in 4 episodes from July-October 1932. According to Joe Wheeler (foreword 2016 ed) The Lost Wagon Train is seen as a companion piece to Fighting Caravans. Not until 1936 did Harper & Brothers publish The Lost Wagon Train in book form. The story is now available to borrow on Internet Archive. Pages 12, 13 and 175, 176 were not properly scanned.

All authors have their own style of writing. Zane Grey was no exception. The Lost Wagon Train is typical of Zane Grey romances in many ways. Latch has failed at love and failed in the military. Grey has yet again used nature as a character. In addition, the story is written for the white middle-class of his day. However, it is a darker story than most of his others.

“Latch’s band of outlaws and savages hid in Spider Web Canyon awaiting the Kiowa scouts who were to fetch news of any caravans that were approaching.

It was a summer night in 1861. Spider Web Canyon lay up in the first range of mountains rising off the Great Plains. The rendezvous had been a secret hiding-place of Satana, a fierce and bloody chief of the Kiowas. He and Latch had formed a partnership – a strange relation growing out of an accidental joint attack upon a wagon train.” (p. 1)

Chief Set-t’ainte was known as Chief Satana/Satanta among the white population.

Chief Satana in The Lost Wagon Train must be based on Kiowa Chief Satanta, (Set-t’ainte/White Bear). Satanta was a Chief whose guerilla tactics challenged the US Army and slowed down the invasion of his people’s lands. It is easy to forget that the Civil War was a war within a war. In The Lost Wagon Train Satana sees Latch’s gang as a tool to ally with but also as traitors to their people.

Stephen Latch “looked to be around thirty 30 years old and was the son of a Louisiana plantation owner“. When the Confederacy failed to bestow on him a commission in the Confederate Army he duelled with the officer who

“forestalled him. With blood on his hands and with all the Rebel hatred for the North in his heart, he had set out to wage his own battle with the Northerners. From a guerilla warfare it had degenerated into border outlawry.”

To Latch the Kiowas were disposable tools. He would gladly sacrifice them in his impossible search for revenge for acts brought upon himself.

It seems obvious that the way I understand stories depends on how old I am. When I first encountered “Vogntoget som forsvant” (Norwegian translation) I must have been around 10-13 years old. Back then, I read the story as a story without any understanding of the time it was written, the time it was describing and how incredibly difficult it is to determine exactly what makes something “right and wrong/good and bad”. Determining that has become more and more difficult with time. At this point of my life, I find myself unable to do so on purely logical grounds.

Understanding the behaviour of the Kiowa warriors during the first part of The Lost Wagon Train is easy peasy. War consists of a series of gruesome actions. Agreeing to massacre the entire wagon train makes sense as a tactic in this horror. At the 1867 Medicine Lodge Peace Treaty, Satanta spoke: “… I came to say that the Kiowas and Commanches have made with you a peace. The word shall last until the whites break their contract and invite the horrors of war. …” And the whites did.

“This must be the notorious war-cry of Indians, Cynthia recognized in it the great vengeful cry of the tribe that had been deceived, wronged, robbed, murdered.” (p. 58)

In The Lost Wagon Train Satana, Hawk Eye and the Kiowa warriors are stereotypically portrayed and made so Grey’s intended readers would buy his stories. “Uggh!” certainly pops up a lot. They are supporting characters, nothing more.

Other than Stephen Latch, the only other character who comes to life is Corny/Slim Blue. Estelle is more like most of Grey’s female leads. Corny does not appear until the second part of the story. The first part of The Lost Wagon Train is mainly about the forming of Latch’s gang and their massacre of the Bowden wagon train at Tanner’s Swale on Dry Trail. The second part of the story is a sort of redemption story but also has the required romance of any Zane Grey romance story.

“Let go of that woman, Leighton”

Many people see Stephen Latch as an evil man. Would they feel the same if the story had been about the massacre of a Commanche village? Or the annihilation of a plantation in the South? I don’t see either Latch or what he did as particularly evil. Or, rather, no more evil than all the terrible things humans do in the name of a cause. He is an expert at rationalization, objectifying his targets and soothes his conscience enough to go through with what he planned. Latch is a man who wants to survive and does not want to starve while doing so. His time is a brutal one, propaganda is intense and his methods are in line with that time’s methods. So, maybe Latch is not that different from you or me. What Stephen Latch is, is a complex character. I do not particularly like him, but he is still a great character for this story. Nor did I like John Bowden, who was about to be massacred. I have met many John Bowden’s in my life. People who have power over others are definitely not exempt from stupidity. Often it seems as if the degree of their greed equals the degree of their stupidity. Bowden is completely unwilling to even consider the dangers he is putting his caravan in. All that matters is getting his stuff to Fort Union as fast as possible.

My favorite character, as usual, is nature. During the build-up to the battle, Grey uses nature to change the rhythm of the story, possibly to give the reader breathers.

“transforming the canyon from a dark, gray-fogged, stone-faced crack in the wilderness to a magnificent valley of silver and gold iridescence. The wisps of clouds lifted up as on wings of pearly fire, the white cascade tumbled out of a ragged notch in the black rim, to fall and pause and fall again, like fans of lace; …”  (p 19).

Against orders, one person survives the destruction of Bowden’s wagon train. To say that Latch gets the shock of his life, is an understatement.

“Christ. Am I mad? … Who are you?” cried Latch in a frenzy.

“Stephen! You-you! … Oh, that you should be the one to save me.”

She sank to her knees with nerveless hands.

“No! … It can’t be! Not you! That would be too – too horrible.”

“Yes, it is I, Cynthia,” she whispered.

Of course she finds out almost immediately that Latch is leader of the gang. Because he is a weak man, Latch blames his actions on her. And, because of the way women were/are supposed to be, Cynthia accepts that blame.
“In a word – Leader of Latch’s band… To this you have brought me.”
……

“I will welcome death at your hands. I have brought you to this degradation;”

Latch has two friends in the gang. Keetch and Lester Cornwall. Keetch loses his leg in one raid, and stays in Latch’s Field taking care of Cynthia and Latch’s business. Lester Cornwall stays at Latch’s side. Again and again Cornwall warns Latch about another gang-member, Leighton, and every stinking time Latch ignores the danger. In fact, Latch is the only one who does not see the danger Leighton poses. I know it is a necessary literary device for this story, but I just have to say that Latch drove me crazier with this gullibility. Well, actually Grey drove me crazier.

Grey writes historical romances, not historical novels. This is why people, events and places do not match the time of the story. But many of these people, events and places were real. When Latch speaks of the Maxwell Land Grant on Vermigo, he is speaking of a place that actually existed.

When the time came for the gang to dissolve, Latch did well by his people.

“We’re here first. This valley is mine. I bought it from Santana. It is wonderfully rich in grass, water, climate. Farms will prosper here. Game abounds. The hills are covered with timber …My proposition to you all, except Leighton, is this. I’ll start you all with a ranch and cattle – say five hundred head each. A fine start! Also five thousand dollars each! Bunch together with some Mexicans, and Keetch here to superintend, and throw up cabins corrals, barns. Build homes. Get yourselves wives, even if they have to be squaws. And live down the past.”

And that brings us to the second part of the story. On page 152 Grey brings us to a future time that has Corny/Slim Blue as a main character, Estelle Latch is another one, and, this time around, Stephen Latch as a supporting character to both their stories. It begins with Slim saving Estelle and that, of course, brings romance into The Lost Wagon Train. Romance fraught with complications, huge complications – the kind Zane Grey loves. Gigantic complications rooted in Stephen Latch’s past.

Again, we see Grey’s love of the landscape when he writes about Corny’s reaction to seeing Latch’s Field for the first time.

Like all the valleys in this region, Latch’s headed in a notch under the hills. Only this one was by far the most imposing and beautiful of the ones he had seen. Green squares attracted his speculative eyes, groves of cottonwoods and ridges with a line of walnut trees marched to the opposite wall, meadows like parks of golden grass shone against the sunset. (p. 181)

Because of the way meaning changes, some of Greys sentences made me smile. All stories from that era do that to me. “Making love” is not intercourse nor does “ejaculation” have anything to do with semen. “Gay” is happy etc.

Latch’s way of being able to live with what he had done, accepting but not condoning, seems like a sensible method. It reminds me of stories from Rwanda. No matter what his motives were, Latch completely changed his behaviour once the band was dissolved. Leighton is a great example of what might happen if a person get stuck in their past. Yet letting go is such a difficult thing to do. The Tutsi and Hutu certainly know all about that. Just look at the way many Germans still try to make up for something their grandparents did. I certainly struggle plenty with letting go of hurt.


The Lost Wagon Train is found on Internet Archive


Reviews:


Translations:

  • Audio: The Lost Wagon Train; Narrated by John McLain; Brilliance Audio, 2017
  • Czech: Zmizelá karavana; Translated by Josef Vorel; Illustration by Zdeněk Burian; V Praze, Novina, 1938
    • Illustration by Josef Ulč; V Brno, Novina, 1993
  • German: Die Todeskarawane; Translated by Franz Eckstein; Berlin, Th. Knaur Nachf. 1937
    • Todes-Treck; Translated by E. Tabory; Bergisch Gladbach, Bastei-Verl, 1968
    • Der letzte Wagenzug; Translated by Alfred Dunkel; München, Wilhelm Heyne, 1973
  • Hungarian: Úri bandita és városi leány; Translated by Kosáryné Réz Lola; Budapest: Palladis, 1938
  • Italian: La carovana scomparsa; Translated by Nicoletta Coppini; Illustration by Guido Crepax; Milano, Sonzogno, 1968
  • Norwegian: Vogntoget som forsvant; Translated by Lars Berge; Oslo, Ingar Weyer Tveitan, 1961
  • Polish: Zaginiony tabor; Translated by Janina. Sujkowska; Illustrated by Lucjan Jagodziński; Warszawa: M. Arct, 1938
  • Portugese; A caravana perdida; Translated by Raul Correia; Illustration by Carlos Alberto Santos; Lisboa, Agencia Portuguesa de Revistas, 1961
  • Spanish; La caravana perdida; Translated by Luis Conde Vélez; Barcelona, Bruguera, 1950
    • Translated by Ramón Margalef Llambrich; Barcelona Molino, 1982
    • Argentina, Librostauro, 2010
  • Swedish: Vagntåget som försvann; Translated by J.E. Berg; Stockholm, Interdeal AB, 1964

Comics


Sources

 
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Posted by on 2017-07-28 in Books

 

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Dreaming of Idaho: Illuminating the Literature of Idaho through Zane Grey’s Thunder Mountain.

Stoddart, R. A. (2016). Dreaming of Idaho: Illuminating the Literature of Idaho through Zane Grey’s Thunder Mountain. From The Selected Works of Rick A. Stoddart; University of Idaho

Odds are that most Idaho writers did not grow up dreaming of becoming an “Idaho” author. Smart money would assume they simply desired to write, and be prosperous in writing, and geographic location played no part in their decision to put pen to paper. However, readers often like to associate authors with geographic regions. This is because the work either contains elements of that region within its content or the author has some connection to the area through birth or place of residence. Idaho readers are no different in that regard, embracing writers such as Vardis Fisher or Mary Hallock Foote. While “Idaho author” may seem like a simple concept to define, it is actually a nuanced literary construction. For example, Ernest Hemingway is often considered an Idaho author but he is also claimed by many other states and places around the world. This essay will examine what goes into making a writer an Idaho author. This undertaking will use Western genre novel writer Zane Grey’s 1932 novel Thunder Mountain which is set in Idaho to examine this literary exploration. Thunder Mountain is a fictionalized telling of the Idaho mining camp of the same name.

What is our collective fascination with the fictions and truths of the West and by extension Idaho? Robert Penn Warren tapped into something true when writing about a character briefly seeking solace in the physical and metaphorical West in All The King’s Men (1946).

“For West is where we all plan to go some day. It is where you go when you get the letter saying: Flee, all is discovered. It is where you go when you look down at the blade in your hand and see blood on it. It is where you go when you are told that you a bubble on the tide of empire. It is where you go when you hear that thar’s gold in them-thar hills. It is where you go to grow up with the country. It is where you go to spend your old age. Or it is just where you go. (p.286)”

But this Robert Penn Warren character is only a visitor to the West — an interloper or outsider — defining what the West is for us.

Zane Grey’s Thunder Mountain might certainly be viewed in the same way towards its description of Idaho. It is a fictionalized telling of the Idaho mining camp of the same name. The story centers on a rough and tumble cowboy from Missouri turned miner, who garnered his reputation in Montana. He takes under his wing a tenderfoot father and daughter from out East and helps interpret the wild west of Idaho for them. Ironically, this outsider interpretation for others of Idaho, its landscapes and experiences, is reminiscent of many writers who live in and write about Idaho. Grey was not from Idaho, nor did he live here. Thunder Mountain is his only significant work with a setting in Idaho. So then, is Grey’s interpretation of Idaho an accurate one? Is this Idaho literature?

Grey was known to write formulaic novels. Ronald (1975) describes the Zane Grey formula in this manner.

“An Easterner – that is, an innocent – arrives in the West. He, or she, has been a failure in the past and seems unprepared to meet the challenges ahead. The land at first seems harsh and unforgiving – the sun is too hot, the canyons too deep, the peaks too rugged, the rivers too swift. Problems are compounded by the appearance of evil, of men who live by their guns and who care nothing for the rights of others. Gradually, however, the neophyte becomes a man. Rather than be beaten by the environment, he learns to conquer the elements, and in doing so acquires a deep appreciation for the land. (p. 13)

Thunder Mountain definitely follows this familiar plot-line but Ronald also notes that “(m)ost important, the Zane Grey formula is an outgrowth of the author’s personal experiences, a reiteration of his own journey to the frontier” (Ronald, 1975 p.13). Grey did indeed experience Idaho as he journeyed to the remote area around Thunder Mountain on a multi-day horse packing trip. This trip served as the basis of inspiration for the rich descriptions he includes in Thunder Mountain such as this description along a canyon in the Salmon River:

“Somehow it had induced lingering hours of happy reverie, to which he had long been a stranger. The place was down around the bend from the valley, where a bench of sage nestled under a great wall. The melodious murmur of the stream came up; the warm sun beat down; the sweetness of sage almost intoxicating; the solitude was omnipresent; and across the canyon a tremendous broken slope as many-sided as that mountain could boast. Long glistening slants of talus, rugged narrow defiles winding up, grassy benches fringed with fir, huge sections of splintered cliff hanging precariously, and patches of black lodge-pole lines stepped endlessly to the blue sky (p.15).”

This trip has been documented in at least two articles (Kimball 1973; Waite 1996) and each approach this trip through the eyes of an Idahoan marveling at the otherness of Zane Grey with his fancy saddle and Japanese cook that accompanies him. Despite the otherness of Zane Grey’s camping provisions, it could be argued that Grey did indeed experience Idaho and this experience is found with the surprisingly descriptive prose of Thunder Mountain. Ronald (1975) notes that Grey had once stated “My inspiration to write has always come from nature. Character and action are subordinated to setting (p.14).” Ronald concurs but suggests alternatively that “Character and action are not subordinated to setting, but rather are developed by it. The three work together, with setting providing the impetus for change (p.14-15).” As setting plays such an important role in the development of Grey’s work, it could then be thought that the setting of Idaho is the primary protagonist in Thunder Mountain since, as Ronald suggests, it is the vehicle which not only drives the plot but also initiates change in the characters. From this angle, Thunder Mountain is indeed a book about Idaho and should be embraced heartily as part of its literature.

The rest of the article is found at Bepress

 
 

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Zane Grey and images of the American West

In 1995 Kevin S. Blake wrote an article about Zane Grey’s influence on popular culture. In his introduction he says:

“The western novels by Zane Grey have been a source of imagery about the American West for almost the entire twentieth century. The plots and characterizations of Grey’s popular novels set in the American West have been thoroughly examined, but it is less clear how his work acquired a fundamental role in the creation of western imagery. With the ability to influence much of the public, mass media dominate the molding of popular culture. A medium that repeatedly projects a set of simple ideas can define the amorphous perceptual lenses through which people view a landscape and fuse them into a clear, uniformly perceived place image. Movies and television now often clarify place perceptions, but literature traditionally played a key role.

Speculation about the meaning of the American West, a landscape that occupies center stage in American folklore, is more profitable with an understanding of the evolution of the ideas that are attached to the place. This article explains how Grey’s distinctive combination of spatial, temporal, landscape and social elements crystallized the enduring idea of a mythical West and qualified him as a place-defining novelist (Shortridge 1991). My mapping and analysis of Grey’s settings lead me to contend that he shaped popular attitudes about the extent of the boundaries of the West and the location of its core. Furthermore, the temporal settings of these novels proved integral to continuing popular acceptance of the western myth. I also illustrate how Grey’s evocative portrayal of the landscape and social characteristics of the region is representative of the western imagery. I discuss modern ramifications of Grey’s imagery in each section, and a review of the western myth making that preceded Grey and his unparalleled record of popularity provides the context for understanding his power of place definition.”

The entire article may be read at: Blake, K. S. (1995). Zane Grey and images of the American West. Geographical Review, 202-216.

 
 

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The Trail Driver: Zane Grey (1931)

Translator: Hansheinz Werner

Translator: Hansheinz Werner

Zane Grey’s stories were mainly written to entertain. Entertainment was achieved through action- and romance-driven stories. For a story written in the early 1900’s, there was quite a bit of cussing and violence. Readers should be aware of changes in word-usage. Commonly used words back then are considered racist today. Views expressed in The Trail Driver romanticize cowboys and discriminate against women, Native-Americans and African-Americans. In most ways The Trail Driver is representative of the propaganda of its day (Wisniewski/Nakamura).

Comment by Zane Grey in 1936, Cant, C.C. (2008)

American tribes

Portion of US map compiled by Aaron Carapella detailing Americans in the US before Europeans invaded

By the time of the cattle-drives, most of the Plains Indian tribes had been decimated in the genocide of Native American (Jawort). The Comanche were too busy trying surviving the American Army to fight cattle drives for anything but survival (Miheshua, p. 14).

The Trail Driver enters the US at a turning-point of the cattle-drives (1871). It was first published as a serial in McCall’s Magazine, Oct. 1931—Feb. 1932 and later published as hard-cover by Harper & Bros in 1935. Friesen points out that Zane Grey got the crossing of the Chisholm Trail at Doan’s Store wrong. Other than that, Grey seems to have his facts straight. (VC Friesen, ch. 27).

Adam Brite is a Euro-American, middle-aged, single and childless man. He has just made a profit off a run on the Chisholm-trail and seeks to further that profit by a second run. This time he is overly optimistic in buying 4500 head of long-horns (ornery buggers) plus about 200 mustangs for his remuda.

“A 12-man crew could manage a herd of 2,000 to 3,000 head. The trail boss was the ultimate authority on the trail, like the captain of a ship, and was paid $100 to $125 a month. Of the rest of the crew, the cook was the most important, earning about $60 per month.” (Texas Almanac)

Adam’s role in the story is that of father-figure. He joins in the work and tries to not play favorites. In many ways Brite’s role is to point out to the reader what might be going on inside people’s heads: “that the Uvalde cowboy had been shot through the heart by something vastly different from a bullet.” Sometimes he pranks Joe or Reddie if the mood hits him. I guess Adam is a greedy, kind-hearted racist man who was somewhat aware of his own racism.

The foreman Adam got himself has an excellent reputation. Like any good owner, he lets Texas Joe Shipman handle the crew as Joe sees fit. Joe is “tall amber-eyed, tawny-haired young giant might well play havoc with the heart of any fancy-free girl“. Fortunately, he is much more than that. He has to keep the feisty crew in check. Like he says: “I reckon I gotta make myself disliked,” The person he struggles most with (in true Zane Grey romance style) is Reddie Blayne. Joe organizes defense and offense against cattle-rustlers (Russ Hite and gang) and deals with Commanches. His worst problems are the combination of weather and long-horn cattle. .

Joe brings his friend Less Holden along “No better ever forked a hawse. But Less is the wildest hombre.” We don’t see much of Less during the story. His character is one on the outskirts of the crew and its adventure. Less calls himself a “walking calendar” due to his ability to figure out what day it is. The explanation is quite mundane, but I do not want to be a spoil-sport.

Library of Congress

Photo by William Henry Jackson, 1843-1942

Alabama Moze is the cook. “It took no second glance for the boss to be assured that this cook was a treasure“. He brought his own stocked chuck-wagon. In addition to being the place where food is made, the cowhands sleep under it if it rains. Alabama’s job is tough. In addition to getting up hours before the drivers and wranglers, Alabama has to haul wood whenever it was available or use dried cow/buffalo-turds for his fire. At times the chuck-wagon has to be hauled across rivers that sometimes went wild. Alabama is African-American. Grey shows us how African-Americans were usually (Massey, SA) treated on cattle-runs, “... On the trail it was not usual for any rider to share the tasks of a negro. Manifestly Pan Handle Smith was a law unto himself…”. Being the cook, Alabama was probably treated better than regular African-American cow-hands. He is the only one of the crew whose fate we do not learn.

Pan Handle Smith is a gun-fighter and “might have rode up this Trail with Jesse Chisholm an been doin’ it ever since.” Giff MacShane told me that Pan is Pecos Smith in West of the Pecos. When Adam hires him, Smith is looking to get out of San Antonio. Gun-fighters weren’t bad guys/gals per se. “Pan Handle Smith had been outlawed, but he had really been more sinned against than sinning.” During the story, Smith calms tempers in both cattle and feisty teen-agers and supports Shipman as foreman.

The Uvalde quintet are “de finest an’ fightenest boys I ever seen,“. Their leader is Deuce Ackerman who “appeared to be the most forceful personality“, a quality needed to handle his friends. We see more of him than the other four. San Sabe comes a close second. San Sabe “had Indian or Mexican blood, and his lean shape wore the stamp of vaquero.” He has a lovely voice and it works wonders “That was the magic by which the trail drivers soothed the restless long-horns.” Rolly Little is “small and round. He had yellow hair, a freckled face, and flashing brown eyes, as sharp as daggers.” Ben Chandler is a “typical Texas youth, long, rangy, loose-jointed, of sandy complexion and hair, and eyes of clear, light blue“. His drinking problem gets him into serious trouble with Deuce, Joe and Adam. Roy Hallett is the last of the five. He is “a quiet, somber, negative youth“.

In addition, Adam is joined by Hal Bender, “the tenderfoot from Pennsylvania, appeared to be a hulking youth, good natured and friendly, though rather shy“, and Whittaker (no first name) was “a red-faced, sleepy-eyed, young rider of twenty-two, notable for his superb physique“. Finally, at Pecan Swale, their first stop, their last addition in the form of Reddie Bayne arrives: “Before the rider stopped Brite answered to a presagement not at all rare in him—that there were meetings and meetings along the trail. This one was an event.” Brite is correct in his presentiment. No Reddie, no The Trail Driver.

Artist: Edward Rapier, July 27, 1878

Artist: Edward Rapier, July 27, 1878

Shortly after the arrival of Reddie, Grey reveals that Bayne is a girl. While not common, women on the trail were a known phenomenon. They chose this tough life for many reasons. “An’ I got the idee pretendin’ to be a boy would make it easier. Thet helped a lot. But I’d always get found oot.” Turns out the last boss who found her out wants her back. Wallen, a rancher from Braseda, is a nasty guy. He rides into the camp at Pecan Swale demanding Reddie: “… I want this rider, Reddie Bayne. He come to me in a deal I made with Jones at Braseda.” At this point the crew learns that Reddie is a girl. Adam has known it for some time.

Wallen is joined by Ross Hite. Ross is a cattle- and mustang-rustler. “Humph! Mebbe Hite is at the haid of this new game,” declared the boss, seriously. “Cattle-drivers sometimes lose half their stock from stampeders. I’ve heahed of one whole herd bein’ stole.” To add to the tension of the story, Grey throws in Comanche raiders.

The Indian mustangs were haltered to the saplings at the edge of the glade. What a ragged, wild-eyed bunch! They had nothing but halters. These they strained against at every rifle-shot. And more than a few of them faced the covert where the drivers lay in ambush. They had caught a scent of the whites. Heads were pointed, ears high, nostrils quivering.

Even the weather conspires to make life miserable for the drivers. In real life, the weather and ornery nature of the long-horns were enough of a challenge on most drives.

The night fell dark, with rumble of thunder and sheet lightning in the distance. The tired cattle bedded down early and held well all night. Morning came lowering and threatening, with a chill wind that swept over the herd from the north. Soon the light failed until day was almost as dark as night. A terrific hailstorm burst upon the luckless herd and drivers. The hailstones grew larger as the storm swept on, until the pellets of gray ice were as large as walnuts. The drivers from suffering a severe pounding passed to extreme risk of their lives. They had been forced to protect heads and faces with whatever was available. Reddie Bayne was knocked off her horse and carried senseless to the wagon; San Sabe swayed in his saddle like a drunken man; Texas Joe tied his coat round his sombrero and yelled when the big hailstones bounced off his head; bloody and bruised, the other drivers resembled men who had engaged in fierce fistic encounters.

I still enjoy Zane Grey’s stories, but keep on wondering how I would read them if I was Native American or African American. Whenever gender bias comes up, I’m jarred out of the flow. That is most likely a good thing and might well have to do with my sense of fairness evolving. Reading stories that were written almost 100 years ago, is always a strange experience. Noting that many stories today are still as problematic is kind of depressing.

During its heyday, between 1867 and 1884, some five million cattle and an equal number of mustangs were moved along the trail. 


The Trail Driver is available for free at Faded Page and Roy Glashan’s Library


Reviews:


Translations:

  • Croatian: Gonič stada; Translator: Omer Lakomica; Rijeka, Otokar Keršovani, 1966
  • Czech: Jezdci z pastvin; Translator:  Jaroslava  Vojtěchová; Praha: Olympia (to 1992), 1965
  • Finnish: Aavikon ratsastaja; Translator: Werner Anttila; Porvoo, Helsinki, W. Söderström, 1939
  • German: In der Prärie; Translator: Dr. Franz Eckstein, Berlin, Th. Knaur Nachf, 193
    • Sie kämpften sich durch; Translator: Hansheinz Werner; München: F. Schneider, 1969
    • In der Prärie; Translator: Hansheinz Werner; München: Heyne, 1981
  • Hungarian: A vöröshajú leány; Translator: Ruzitska Mária; Budapest, Palladis, 1937
  • Italian: La lunga pista; Translator: Simonetta Damiani; Milano, Sonzogno, 1968 (Cover artist: Guido Crepax)
  • Norwegian: Texas Joe; Translator: Claes Henrik Jaeger; Oslo, Ingar Weyar Tveitan, 1958
    • Chisholm-ruten; Translator: Claes Henrik Jaeger; Oslo, Fredhøi, 1982
  • Portugese: O guia da montanha; Translator: Fernanda Pinto Rodrigues; Lisboa: Ag. Port. de Revistas, 1959
  • Spanish: El conductor de manadas; Translator: Lino Novás Calvo / José Luis Fernández; Barcelona, Juventud, 1937

Sources

 

 
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Posted by on 2016-06-08 in Books

 

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The Trail Driver: art

 

 
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Posted by on 2016-05-26 in Artwork

 

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New monument to honor Paiutes slain in Circleville Massacre

Paiutes are some of the main characters in Zane Grey’s Wild Horse Mesa. Given his relationship with Paiute individuals, I imagine he would have strong feelings about this massacre and the role of the Mormons. This article about the intended memorial tells the story of the killing of 30 Paiute men, women and children for no other reason than unfounded fear and lack of information.

By , Deseret News
Published: Thursday, April 14 2016 12:45 p.m. MDT | Updated: Thursday, April 14 2016 10:46 p.m. MDT

An artist’s rendering of a new memorial that will mark a dark but rarely mentioned moment in Utah history when Mormon settlers slaughtered as many as 30 Paiute men, women and children in the small town of Circleville 150 years ago. The monument will be dedicated April 22, 2016.; By Sunrise Engineering

A new memorial will mark a dark but rarely mentioned moment in Utah history when Mormon settlers slaughtered as many as 30 Paiute men, women and children in the small town of Circleville 150 years ago.

CIRCLEVILLE, Piute County — A new memorial will mark a dark but rarely mentioned moment in Utah history when Mormon settlers slaughtered as many as 30 Paiute men, women and children in the small town of Circleville 150 years ago.

The massacre with guns, knives and clubs happened in April 1866 during the Black Hawk War because of unfounded fears by the settlers that the Paiute Koosharem band posed a threat, even though the two groups had been friendly.

Despite being the worst atrocity committed against Native Americans in Utah, it became a hidden chapter in state history. Paiute people know little of what happened to their ancestors. Circleville residents — none of whom are original descendants of the perpetrators — don’t talk about it.

But that is changing.

The Paiute Tribal Council, Utah Division of State History, Circleville, LDS Church Historical Department, Utah Westerners and some independent historians felt compelled to recognize the victims.

On April 22 — the suspected date of the massacre — they will dedicate a monument to the slain Paiutes in Memorial Park in Circleville. It will provide a solemn place of contemplation and commemoration to honor the victims of one of Utah’s saddest episodes.

“I think it’s going to be beautiful,” said Dorena Martineau, Paiute Tribe cultural resources director. “Hopefully the remains, the spirits of our past ancestors can come to rest.”

The Paiute Tribe wrote the inscriptions for the granite monument, which in part say, “None of us can ever hope to describe the emotions that these people might have felt. All we can do is honor their existence as human beings.”

“The story here is about the victims, and it’s about the process of forgetting the victims,” said Jed Rogers, a Utah state historian. “How is that we have a tragic event that very, very few people in this state know anything about. That, to me, compounds the tragedy of Circleville.”……….

The rest of the article is on Deseret News

 
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Posted by on 2016-04-17 in General

 

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Art based on “Wildfire”

My book-review of Wildfire

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 2015-12-20 in Artwork

 

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Wildfire – 1923 film adaptation

1922: When Romance Rides. Information found on IMdB

“When Zane Grey‘s novel, Wildfire, was filmed here, it somehow turned into a hoary Drury Lane-style melodrama, set in the West instead of England. While chasing an unruly colt through the hills, Lin Slone (Carl Gantvoort) is knocked unconscious. Lucy Bostil (Claire Adams) finds him — a stroke of luck, since her father (Charles Arling), who owns a stable, has a formidable rival in the villainous Bill Cordts (Harry L. Van Meter). Cordts will do anything to make sure his horse beats out Bostil’s in the next race, including drugging the steed. Slone has trained his colt, named Wildfire, to carry a rider, and he gives him to Lucy, providing she ride it in the race. She does, and Wildfire wins. But the story’s not over yet — in one last bit of villainy, Cordts and his half-wit accomplice, Joel Creech (a not-very half-witted Jean Hersholt), kidnap Lucy. Sloan, of course, heads into the mountains and rescues her for the requisite ending clinch. ~ Janiss Garza, Rovi

Produced by Benjamin B. Hampton Productions Co.

Directed by Jean Hersholt, Eliot Howe and Charles O. Rush

Adapted by Benjamin B. Hampton based on WildfireMy review of the novel)

Cast:

Claire Adams Claire Adams …Lucy Bostil

Carl Gantvoort Carl Gantvoort …Lin Slone

Jean Hersholt Jean Hersholt …Joel Creech

Harry von Meter Harry von Meter …Bill Cordts

Charles Arling Charles Arling …Bostil

Mary Jane Irving …’Bostie’ Bostil

Tod Sloan …Holley

Audrey Chapman …Lucy’s Chum

Frank Hayes Frank Hayes …Dr. Binks

Helen Howard …Lucy’s Chum

Stanley J. Bingham …Dick Sears

Walter Perkins …Thomas Brackton

Babe London Babe London …Sally Brackton

John Beck …Van

Cinematography by William M. Edmond and Gus Peterson


Also released in Portugese as Romance da Planície

Reviews:

 

 
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Posted by on 2015-09-15 in Movies

 

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The world Zane Grey wrote about

Map of North- and Central America just before contact with outsiders. Compiled by Aaron

Map of North- and Central America just before contact with outsiders. Compiled by Aaron Carapella

The above map compiled by Aaron Carapella at tribalnationsmaps.com shows what tribes were in existence and where they were just before they came into contact with non-Americans (or illegal immigrants as they are called today). Zane Grey mainly writes about the US but he also ventures into Canada and even as far south as Peru. Research shows that Native-American roots in the Americas go back at least 12 000 years to a time when people migrated across Beringua all the way down to what is known today as the Yucatan Peninsula.(*ed.)

Betty Zane is Zane Grey’s first story and also a semi-biographical work about his great-great… grandmother and her courage. Fort Henry (its final name) was finished in 1774 in West Virginia soon after the end of the French/British war for colonial ownership of the land. The American revolution between the British and the settlers were at its very beginning. Between and against the two were the Native Americans.

This map drawn by Thomas Conder shows how the immigrants saw North America in 1775. I have marked the approximate location of Fort Henry

Source: raremaps.com | I have marked the approximate location of Fort Henry

Source: raremaps.com | I have marked the approximate location of Fort Henry

By the end of the timeline of Zane Grey’s stories (1932), borders and languages had been changed to fit Western European/Christian thinking and politics and appear more or less as we know them today.

Source: mapsoftheworld.com

Source: mapsoftheworld.com

As time flows its inevitable way to change, these borders and languages will probably once again change hands.

Below is the timeline of Zane Grey’s Western stories and the Ohio River Trilogy (none of the children’s stories or semi-biographical works have been included). Along with that you will find the setting of the story. Dr. Kevin S. Blake at the Zane Grey West Society is responsible for most of this information.

Time Setting Title Year Publ. Place Setting
c. 1774 Betty Zane 1903 Fort Henry, Ohio River
1777-1782 The Spirit of the Border 1906 PA: Allegheny and Monongahela rivers
1783 The Last Trail 1909 Fort Henry, Ohio River
1856-1870 Fighting Caravans 1929 Santa Fe Trail
KS: Fort Larned
1861-1879 The Lost Wagon Train 1936 Santa Fe Trail
NM: Fort Union
1861 Western Union 1939 Western Union telegraph route (Omaha to Fort Bridger)
NE: Chimney Rock
1863 The Border Legion 1916 a) ID: central
b) MT: Virginia City, Alder Gulch
1864-1869 The U.P. Trail 1918 Union Pacific Railroad (Omaha to Promontory Point)
WY: Laramie Mountains
1865-1871 West of the Pecos 1937 TX: Pecos River Horsehead Crossing
TX: Langtry
c. 1870 Wildfire 1917 AZ: Lees Ferry, Monument Valley
1870s The Lone Star Ranger 1915 a) TX: Nueces River headwaters
b) TX: western, Mount Ord
1871 Riders of the Purple Sage 1912 UT: southeastern
AZ: Tsegi Canyon
1871 The Trail Driver 1936 Chisholm and Western cattle trails
TX: Colorado River crossing
1874-1877 The Thundering Herd 1925 TX: Red River & Pease River headwaters
TX: Llano Estacado
1874-1875 Knights of the Range 1939 NM: Cimarron
1877 Robbers’ Roost 1932 UT: Dirty Devil River, Henry Mountains
c. 1878 The Heritage of the Desert 1910 AZ: Lees Ferry, Painted Desert
1878-1892 Wanderer of the Wasteland 1923 a) CA: Chocolate Mountains
b) CA: Death Valley
1878-1885 Shadow on the Trail 1946 a) TX: Denton County
b) AZ: Tonto Basin, Doubtful Canyon
1880 Twin Sombreros 1941 CO: Las Animas
c. 1880 Valley of Wild Horses 1947 NM: Magdalena
c. 1880 The Fugitive Trail 1957 TX: Brazos River headwaters
1880s Raiders of Spanish Peaks 1938 a) KS: Garden City
b) CO: Spanish Peaks
1880s The Arizona Clan 1958 AZ: Tonto Basin
c. 1885 The Man of the Forest 1920 AZ: White Mountains, Pinedale
c. 1885 Sunset Pass 1931 AZ: Sunset Mountains
1885-1918 30,000 on the Hoof 1940 AZ: Mogollon Plateau, Miller Canyon
1886 The Rainbow Trail 1915 AZ: Tsegi Canyon
UT: Rainbow Bridge
1887 To the Last Man 1922 AZ: Pleasant Valley, Mogollon Plateau
1889 The Drift Fence 1933 AZ: Flagstaff, Mogollon Plateau
1889 The Maverick Queen 1950 WY: South Pass City
1889-1890 The Hash Knife Outfit 1933 AZ: Mogollon Plateau
c. 1890 The Mysterious Rider 1921 CO: Gore Range, Middle Park
c. 1890 Forlorn River 1927 CA: Tule Lake
c. 1890 “Nevada” 1928 a) CA: Tule Lake
b) AZ: Mogollon Plateau, Chevelon Canyon
c. 1890 Wild Horse Mesa 1928 UT: Kaiparowits Plateau
c. 1890 The Dude Ranger 1951 AZ: Springerville
c. 1890 Stranger From the Tonto 1956 a) Sonora: western
b) UT: Hole in the Rock
c. 1892-1905 Arizona Ames 1932 a) AZ: Hellsgate on Tonto Creek
b) WY: Pinedale
c) UT: Hurricane Cliffs
d) CO: Troublesome Creek in Middle Park
1896 Stairs of Sand 1943 CA: Salton Sea
c. 1900 Black Mesa 1955 AZ: Black Mesa
1906 Thunder Mountain 1935 ID: Salmon River Mountains
c. 1910 Horse Heaven Hill 1959 WA: Colville Indian Reservation
1912 Desert Gold 1913 a) AZ: Altar Valley
b) Sonora: Pinacate Range
1912 The Light of Western Stars 1914 AZ: San Bernardino Valley
NM: Peloncillo Mountains
1916-1919 The Vanishing American 1925 AZ: Kayenta
UT: Valley of the Gods, Navajo Mtn.
1917-1918 The Desert of Wheat 1919 WA: southeastern
1919-1920 The Shepherd of Guadaloupe 1930 NM: Las Vegas
1920-1921 The Call of the Canyon 1924 AZ: Oak Creek Canyon
1920 Rogue River Feud 1948 OR: Rogue River
1920s Under the Tonto Rim 1926 AZ: Tonto Basin
1920s Code of the West 1934 AZ: Tonto Basin
1920s Captives of the Desert 1952 AZ: Black Mesa
1920s Lost Pueblo 1954 AZ: Tsegi Canyon
1924 The Deer Stalker 1949 AZ: Kaibab Plateau, Grand Canyon
1930 Wyoming 1953 WY: Antelope Hills
1932 Majesty’s Rancho 1942 AZ: San Bernardino Valley
NM: Peloncillo Mountains
1932 Boulder Dam 1963 NV: Hoover Dam
Based on information from http://www.zgws.org/zggeomap.php

(*ed.) 10 02 2016 I edited the last part of this paragraph after it had been pointed out to me that my previous paragraph was highly offensive to Native-Americans. I unequivocally apologize for this offense and will strive to do better.

 

 
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Posted by on 2015-08-20 in General

 

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Gallery

Art based on “The Border Legion”

 
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Posted by on 2015-07-17 in Artwork

 

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Film adaptations of “The Border Legion”: 1918, 1924, 1930, 1934

The Border Legion: my book review

1918: The Border Legion (Silent movie in black and white)

Produced by Goldwyn Pictures Productions

Directed by T. Hayes Hunter

  • Assistant director Claude Camp

Adapted by Victor de Viliers and Lawrence Marston

Cast (in credits order)

Blanche Bates Blanche Bates …Joan Randall; Hobart Bosworth Hobart Bosworth …Jack Kells; Eugene Strong …Jim Cleve; Kewpie Morgan Kewpie Morgan …Gorilla Gulden; Russell Simpson Russell Simpson …Overland Bradley; Arthur Morrison Arthur Morrison …Sheriff Roberts; Bull Montana Bull Montana …Red Pierce; Richard Souzade …Bate Wood; Kate Elmore …Mrs. Wood

Cinematography by Abe Scholtz

Film Editing by Alex Troffey

Reviews:

1924: The Border Legion (Silent movie in black-and-white)

Produced by Famous Players-Lasky Corporation

Directed by William K. Howard

Adapted for screen by George C. Hull

Cast (in credits order)

Antonio Moreno Antonio Moreno …Jim Cleve; Helene Chadwick Helene Chadwick …Joan Randle; Rockliffe Fellowes Rockliffe Fellowes …Kells; Gibson Gowland Gibson Gowland …Gulden; Charles Ogle Charles Ogle …Harvey Roberts; Jim Corey Jim/James Corey …Pearce; Eddie Gribbon Eddie/Edward Gribbon …Blicky; Luke Cosgrave Luke Cosgrave …Bill Randle

Cinematography by Alvin Wyckoff

Presented by Jesse L. Lasky and Adolph Zukor

  • French: Les loups de la frontière
  • Portugese: Os Dramas do Oeste

Reviews:

1930: Border Legion (Mono sound in black-and-white format)

Produced by Paramount Publix Corporation
Directed by Otto Brower and Edwin H. Knopf
Adapted for film by Percy Heath and Edward E. Paramore Jr.
Cast (in credits order)

Jack HoltJack Holt…Jack Kells; Fay WrayFay Wray…Joan Randall; Richard ArlenRichard Arlen…Jim Cleve; Eugene PalletteEugene Pallette…Bunco Davis;Stanley FieldsStanley Fields…Hack Gulden; E.H. CalvertE.H. Calvert…Judge Savin; Ethan Allen…George Randall; Syd SaylorSyd Saylor…Shrimp; Hank BellHank Bell…Kells Gang Member; Jim CoreyJim Corey…Kells Gang Member; Pat HarmonPat Harmon.

Music by Oscar Potoker
Cinematography by Mack Stengler
Film Editing by Doris Drought
Casting By Fred A. Datig
Sound by Earl S. Hayman
Camera by Eddie New
Casting assistant Dick Stockton
Subtitles/dubbed to:

  • Austrian: Goldgräber in Not
  • Brazilian Portugese: A Legião dos Celerados
  • Greek: Legeon ton synoron

1934: The Last Round-Up (Mono sound in black-and-white format)

Produced by Paramount Pictures

  • Producer Harold Hurley

Directed by Henry Hathaway

  • Assistant director Neil Wheeler

Adapted for film by Jack Cunningham

Cast

Randolph ScottRandolph Scott…Jim Cleve; Barbara FritchieBarbara (Adams) Fritchie…Joan Randall; Monte BlueMonte Blue…Jack Kells; Fred KohlerFred Kohler…Sam Gulden; Fuzzy KnightFuzzy Knight…Charles Bunko McGee; Richard CarleRichard Carle…Judge Savin; Barton MacLaneBarton MacLane…Charley Benson; Charles MiddletonCharles B. Middleton…Sheriff; Frank RiceFrank Rice…Shrimp; Dick Rush…Rush; Buck ConnorsBuck Connors…Old Man Tracy; Robert (Bob) Miles…Scarface; Sam AllenSam Allen…First Miner; Ben CorbettBen Corbett…Second Miner; Jack (Merrill) Holmes…Bartender; Jim CoreyJim Corey…First Outlaw; Jim MasonJim (James) Mason…Second Outlaw; Charles BrinleyCharles Brinley…Rancher; Charles Murphy…Rancher; Bud OsborneBud Osborne…(uncredited)

Music by Herman Hand

Cinematography by Archie Stout

Sub-titles/dubbed to:

  • Austrian: Todeslegion
  • Brazilian Portugese: O Último Assalto
  • Danish: De Lovløses Brigade
  • Spanish: El último rodeo

Reviews:

  • Mordaunt Hall (New York Times): “… Jim Cleve, a handsome fellow who does not seem to be long on brains …”
 
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Posted by on 2015-05-25 in Movies

 

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Desert Gold (Shower of Gold) artwork

My review of the novel Desert Gold